Articles by Chelsea Whyte

sally ride
Sally Ride, First U.S. Woman in Space, Dies of Cancer at Age 61
Jul 24, 2012 20:18 PM E
Ride, the first American female to enter space, traveled aboard the Challenger space shuttle in 1983 - just five years after women had been granted access to the previously all-male U.S. astronaut corps. A Stanford-educated physicist, she was America's youngest astronaut at the time of her first launch.
diogenite meteorite
Clues to Solar System's Early History Found in Ancient Meteorites
Jul 24, 2012 02:17 AM E
Studies show that mantles of the Earth, Moon and Mars contain more of certain elements than scientists theorize they should. And now, a team looking into meteorites may have figured out why.
heat shield test
NASA Successfully Tests Inflatable Heat Shield Prototype
Jul 24, 2012 01:39 AM E
Using fabric to protect a spacecraft during the scorching temperatures of atmospheric re-entry may sound like a crazy idea, but it could work. NASA tested a new, inflatable heat shield that successfully survived a 7,600 mile-per-hour trip back through Earth's atmosphere.
supernova
Dark Energy Could End Universe In 'Big Rip'
Jul 24, 2012 00:49 AM E
In a theory dubbed the "Big Rip", the density of dark energy will grow to infinity and its gravitational repulsion will continuously increase until it trumps all forces holding objects together, resulting in a tearing apart of everything in the Universe.
bats
Noisy Fly Sex Leads to Death by Bats
Jul 23, 2012 21:52 PM E
When things get frisky, many animals can get a little noisy at times. For the housefly, loud lovemaking can be a death sentence if they're caught in the act by hunting bats.
grand canyon
Awe Inspires a Feeling of Expanded Time
Jul 21, 2012 01:09 AM E
Standing atop the Grand Canyon or laying back to gaze at the stars can inspire a sense of wonder that can actually expand your sense of time, according to new research published in the journal Psychological Science.
titan riverways
Riverbeds on Titan Have Surprisingly Little Erosion
Jul 20, 2012 23:58 PM E
The surface of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, has long been obscured to Earth-bound telescopes by its thick, gas-filled atmosphere. But in 2004, the Cassini-Huygens probe that orbits Saturn returned radar images of Titan's icy terrain carved out over millions of years by rivers of liquid methane.
laser beam
Record-Breaking Laser Delivers 500 Trillion Watts
Jul 20, 2012 23:30 PM E
Physicists at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have produced a record-shattering laser beam at the National Ignition Facility. Using 192 beams of ultraviolet light, the team delivered a laser of more than 500 trillion watts (terawatts or TW) of power focused on a 2 millimeter spot, giving the saying "laser precision" a new meaning.
ocean eddy
Dumping Iron Into Oceans Could Sink Carbon, Slow Global Warming
Jul 20, 2012 02:33 AM E
An international team of scientists has finally published the results of a 2004 experiment to fertilize oceans with iron in an effort to reduce the carbon at the surface of the water and potentially slow global warming.
blood test
Simple Blood Test May Predict Alzheimer's
Jul 20, 2012 01:01 AM E
Researchers have identified a indicator in blood that may help predict Alzheimer's: high levels of a certain fat called ceramides may increase a person's risk of getting dementia.
wine cork
1 in 13 Women Drink Alcohol During Pregnancy, CDC Reports
Jul 20, 2012 00:38 AM E
A new government survey released Thursday revealed that almost 8 percent of pregnant women drink alcohol and sometimes even go on binges.
vegan pizza
NASA Develops Vegan Menu for Future Mission to Mars
Jul 20, 2012 00:02 AM E
Space food isn't limited to Tang and dehydrated ice cream. NASA scientists are devising a new menu for a mission to Mars sometime in the 2030s.
exoplanet
Scientists Discover Nearby Earth-sized Exoplanet Covered in Lava
Jul 19, 2012 03:48 AM E
Astronomers have found a planet two-thirds the size of Earth orbiting a relatively close star. The exoplanet lives 33 light years away and treks around its home star in 1.4 Earth days.
volcano mantle artist rendering
X-Rays Show Origins of Volcano Hot Spots
Jul 19, 2012 02:50 AM E
Scientists have used X-rays to expose the extreme conditions in the Earth's core that lead to volcanoes, offering observational evidence that volcanic hot spots are indeed caused by giant plumes of magma flowing upward from within the Earth.
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