Articles by Gabrielle Jonas

River of hydrogen
River of Cold Hydrogen May Fuel Wild Star Birth In Nearby Galaxy
Jan 28, 2014 13:04 PM E
A river of cold hydrogen flowing from one galaxy to another may be acting like a cosmic umbilical cord, carrying sustenance to young stars.
Model of Noah's Ark
Noah's Ark Was Round, Based On 4,000-Year-Old Mesopotamian Instructions That Are 'Mathematically Accurate'
Jan 28, 2014 09:03 AM E
A 4,000-year-old cuneiform tablet from Mesopotamia instructs a mythological character how to build a round "ark" he can use to rescue his family and animals from a flood.
Always in a Hurry: So Much to See
Mantis Shrimp Eyes See Through A One-Stop Process: Crustacean's Photoreceptors Don't Send Visual Info To Brain
Jan 24, 2014 15:09 PM E
The mantis shrimp is a big crustacean is a big hurry: It may see faster, and punch faster, than any other creature on the planet.
In the new Cyber-Economy, Many Parents need their Children's Assistance
Kids Who Have Less, May Help Their Parents Get Online More
Jan 24, 2014 11:36 AM E
Children are often their parents' guides through cyberspace, and, if they're from lower-income families, they're probably going to be more helpful about it.
Follow the Leader
For Multiple-Dog Households Out On A Walk, It's A Pack Mentality
Jan 23, 2014 17:15 PM E
When out on a walk, dogs will tend to follow the dog that dominates at home, but they're not being bullied: It's because they want to follow that dog, a new study shows.
Clock Made of just Thousands of Atoms Promises to be Most Accurate Clock Ever
Most Accurate Clock In The World: New Strontium Clock Is So Precise It Won't Change One Second in Five Billion Years
Jan 22, 2014 13:49 PM E
A new experimental strontium atomic clock, developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, may be the most accurate clock in the world: it ticks at a maddening 430 trillion per second, setting new records in both precision and stability.
Taiji Cove Slaughter
30 Dolphins Killed In Taiji Cove; Albino Dolphin Baby 'Angel' Captured While Live Stream Shows Blood Seeping Out From Under Tarp Used To Hide Slaughter
Jan 21, 2014 13:31 PM E
A group of dolphins that may have included the mother of Angel, an albino baby dolphin captured by Japanese fishermen, were tied up and stabbed to death Tuesday morning, Reuters reported.
2013 Statewide Temperatures
Climate Change 2013: Last Year Was 4th Warmest Year In Recorded History And 37th Consecutive Year Of Above-Average Global Temperatures
Jan 16, 2014 09:01 AM E
In 2013, climate change took a severe toll on the U.S., according to the National Climatic Data Center's annual report: it was the 4th warmest year on record, and saw over $1 billion in climate disaster-related damages.
Scientists Hope to Capture the Magic and Science of Star-Making
Scientists Are Creating Star Dust In A Lab To Help Explain How Earth Was Formed
Jan 14, 2014 14:29 PM E
A 15-million Euros project in Spain and France will have engineers help astrophysicists build a machine that will create the same star dust spewed by supernovas.
To Your Cat, You're Just a Bigger Cat, With One Job...
To Cats, We're Big Mom Cats, Whom They Can Control Even More Than They Did Their Own Moms
Jan 14, 2014 01:08 AM E
A new book out on cat behavior claims that cats perceive us as oversized cats, but earlier researchers went a step further and said that cats see us as their mothers. Then there are those owners who are convinced that cats see us as their babies.
An Ancient Fish Anticipates the Evolutionary Future
Ancient Fish May Have Walked Underwater: Sea Creature Had Pelvis & Hip Socket Enabling It To 'Walk' With Fins
Jan 13, 2014 15:27 PM E
A fossil of a Tiktaalik roseae fish with a pelvis and hip socket indicates that this ancient fish may have walked underwater, and may have evolutionary biologists recasting their theories as to how and even when vertebrates first walked onto land.
Drawing of an Elephant Shark
Why Sharks Have No Bones: Geneticists Sequence Half-Billion-Year-Old Shark Genome, Yielding Clues About Our Own Immune System
Jan 08, 2014 22:51 PM E
Geneticists sequenced the genome of the elephant shark, saying Wednesday that they now know that the immune system in vertebrates developed more gradually than thought and that sharks once had, but lost, bony skeletons.
By Invitation Only
Gender Gap Among Scientists Could Be Fixed By Having More Women Organize Conferences
Jan 07, 2014 16:55 PM E
Women scientists are more likely to be asked to present their findings by female conference organizers than by male organizers.
Tusks of Elephants Killed for Their Ivory are Destroyed
China Crushes 6 Tons Of Elephant Tusks: US Fears Ivory Trade Funds Terrorism
Jan 07, 2014 13:53 PM E
China destroyed 6.2 metric tons of ivory and ivory sculptures in Dongguan, but the country's voracious demand for ivory is still upping the kill rate of elephants in Africa, where terrorists are getting in on the savage action.
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Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet  Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)