FDA Warns Of Counterfeit Adderall

By Amir Khan on May 30, 2012 12:19 PM EDT

Adderall
An example of counterfeit Adderall (Photo: FDA)

Adderall is in short supply, and people with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder looking to buy their pills online are at risk of ending up with counterfeits, according to the Food and Drug Administration. Though there have been no reports of harm, the FDA warns that the counterfeit pills can be dangerous and do not treat ADHD.

Denise Bradley, spokeswoman for Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, maker of Adderall, told the Philadelphia Inquirer that her company was notified of two examples of counterfeit versions.

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""Both were purchased from illegal websites, not through legitimate distribution channels," she said. "We have reported to the FDA and continue to work with them on the investigation. We were alerted by a consumer who noticed misspellings on the fake product packaging. Our product is packaged in bottles. These fake product are packaged in foil wrappers."

Real Adderall is peach or orange colored, with the letters "dp" imprinted on one side and the number 30 on the other. They are packaged in bottles, not blister packs, and have the National Drug Code (NDC) 0555-0768-02 listed, according to the FDA.

"The counterfeit versions of Adderall should be considered as unsafe, ineffective and potentially harmful," the FDA said in a statement.

The counterfeit Adderall does not contain the active ingredients of the real drug, and therefore will not treat ADHD.

"Adderall contains four active ingredients - dextroamphetamine saccharate, amphetamine aspartate, dextroamphetamine sulfate, and amphetamine sulfate," the FDA said in a statement. "Instead of these active ingredients, the counterfeit product contained tramadol and acetaminophen, which are ingredients in medicines used to treat acute pain."

People are turning to the internet for Adderall because the drug is in short supply, the FDA says.

"Currently on the FDA's drug shortage list, Adderall is in short supply due to active pharmaceutical ingredient supply issues," the organization said in a statement. "Teva continues to release product as it becomes available. Consumers should be extra cautious when buying their medicines from online sources. Rogue websites and distributors may especially target medicines in short supply for counterfeiting."

If you suspect you have a counterfeit version, the FDA recommends you stop taking the product immediately and contact your healthcare professional. 

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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