Australia Implements Controversial Carbon Tax

By Amir Khan on July 2, 2012 9:15 AM EDT

Air Pollution
In a bid to slow down climate change, Australia introduced a carbon tax on Monday intended to reduce emissions. (Photo: National Park Service)

In a bid to slow down climate change, Australia introduced a carbon tax on Monday intended to reduce emissions. While some people, such as Prime Minister Julia Gillard, applauded the move, others are worried that it will hurt businesses.

"Our nation's been involved in a debate now for many long years about putting a price on carbon and tackling climate change, and we have got this done," Gillard told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. "Yes, with a fixed price, a carbon tax if you like for the first three years, and then with an emissions trading scheme to follow."

Like Us on Facebook

The tax will mean the 350 top polluters in the country will have to pay $23 AUD (23.50 USD) for every ton of carbon they produce. The government hopes the tax will reduce the amount of carbon emissions by 159 million tons by 2020 -- the equivalent of taking 45 million cars off the road.

However, the tax has been met with staunch opposition, and conservatives have vowed to repeal the tax if they are elected in 2013.

"(The carbon tax) is the slow boa constrictor sapping life out of one business after another," opposition lawmaker Warren Truss, leader of the Nationals, told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

However, Gillard said conservatives would have a difficult time repealing the measure.

"As a Labor government, we haven't done all of this for no reason, we've done it because we believe it's pivotal to Australia's future," she told the ABC program 'Insiders.' "Today is a Sunday where Australians will go about their ordinary lives, but today is day too when we seize the future, we seize a clean energy future."

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Sponsored From Around the Web

    ZergNet
Follow iScience Times
us on facebook RSS
 
us on google
 
Most Popular
INSIDE iScience Times
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet  Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)