Has The God Particle Been Found? Exciting Announcement To Come On Wednesday

By Amir Khan on July 2, 2012 10:21 AM EDT

Higgs Boson
An example of simulated data modeled for the CMS particle detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Here, following a collision of two protons, a Higgs boson is produced which decays into two jets of hadrons and two electrons. The lines represent the possible paths of particles produced by the proton-proton collision in the detector while the energy these particles deposit is shown in blue. (Photo: Creative Commons)

Scientists working on the Large Hadron Collider are set to announce on Wednesday that they have enough evidence to show that the Higgs Boson, dubbed the 'God Particle,' exists. The European Organization for Nuclear Research, known as CERN for its original French name, has been searching for the Higgs boson using the Large Hadron Collider since November 2009.

While the announcement is exciting, researchers are quick to say that they have not discovered the particle itself. Instead, they've seen a "footprint" of the particle, which proves it exist without the scientists actually catching a glimpse of it.

Like Us on Facebook

Rob Roser, who leads the search for the Higgs boson at the Fermilab in Chicago, likened the discovery to finding a fossilized imprint of a dinosaur.

"You see the footprints and the shadow of the object, but you don't actually see it," he told the Associated Press.

John Ellis, a professor at King's College London who has worked at CERN since the 1970s, told the Associated Press that the announcement will confirm the existence of the Higgs Boson.

"I agree that any reasonable outside observer would say, 'It looks like a discovery,'" he said. ""We've discovered something which is consistent with being a Higgs."

On Dec. 12, researchers from CERN announced that they sighted spikes in data that could represent a Higgs boson, though they cautioned that it also could have been an error. "The excess may be due to a fluctuation, but it could also be something more interesting. We cannot exclude anything at this stage," Fabiola Gianotti, spokesperson for the experiment, told the BBC.

The Higgs boson was first theorized in 1964, and is thought to be the reason particles such as quarks and electrons have mass. Discovery of the Higgs boson would confirm the Standard Model of particle physics, which describes how particles and forces interact and how the universe was formed.

The Large Hadron Collider works by firing two beams of energy around a 27 kilometer (16.7 mile) pipe. The energy beams slam into each other, creating particle collisions that recreate what scientists believe occurred a fraction of a second after the Big Bang. The Large Hadron Collider could theoretically create the Higgs boson, which would exist for a septillionth of a second, but scientists believe they can observe it by examining how it decays.

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Sponsored From Around the Web

    ZergNet
Follow iScience Times
us on facebook RSS
 
us on google
 
Most Popular
INSIDE iScience Times
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet  Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)