Cranberries Do, In Fact, Prevent UTI’s

By Amir Khan on July 10, 2012 11:08 AM EDT

Cranberry
Echoing the advice of many mothers, researchers found that cranberries can protect against urinary tract infections (Photo: Creative Commons)

Echoing the advice of many mothers, researchers found that cranberries can protect against urinary tract infections, according to a new study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine. Cranberries, cranberry juice and cranberry capsules are all effective, according to the study.

While cranberries have long been thought to protect against UTI's, researchers were not able to identify if or how they work. Recent evidence suggests that compounds in cranberries and other berries might be able to prevent bacteria from attaching to the urinary tract, preventing an infection.

Like Us on Facebook

"What this is doing is solidifying what has been folklore for quite some time," Dr. Deborah Wing, a researcher from the University of California, Irvine, who was not involved in the study, told Reuters. "Finally, the science is catching up to what our mothers have been telling us for so many decades."

For the new study, researchers from National Taiwan University Hospital looked at data from 10 studies comprised of approximately 1,500 people who were assigned to take either cranberry products, placebos or nothing. Overall, participants who took the cranberry products had 38 percent fewer UTI's, according to the study.

UTI's are caused by bacteria entering the bladder or kidneys through the urinary tract. They are more common in women than in men, and symptoms include pain or burning during urination, frequent urination, tenderness in the belly, foul-smelling or cloudy urine, fever, chills, nausea and vomiting.

Wing said people should be careful not to overindulge in cranberries because eating too many can cause stomach aches. In addition, the sugar in cranberry juice could pose a problem for diabetics.

Bill Gurley, a pharmaceutical researcher at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock, told Reuters that while cranberries are not the solution to UTI's, women should consider adding them into their diet.

"For individuals that do have problems with recurrent UTIs, incorporating a little cranberry juice in your diet certainly can't hurt," he said. "We still don't know exactly what the correct dose should be, or what the correct form should be."

 

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Sponsored From Around the Web

    ZergNet
Follow iScience Times
us on facebook RSS
 
us on google
 
Most Popular
INSIDE iScience Times
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet  Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)