Are Your Child’s Dental Fillings Changing Their Behavior?

By Amir Khan on July 17, 2012 10:27 AM EDT

Tooth
Dental fillings made from the controversial chemical bisphenol-A may cause your child's behavior to change, according to a new study (Photo: Creative Commons)

Dental fillings made from the controversial chemical bisphenol-A may cause your child's behavior to change, according to a new study, published in the journal Pediatrics on Monday. Researchers found that these new plastic fillings, which are being phased in instead of the common mercury-containing fillings, changed children's behavior.

Plastics manufacturers use BPA to harden plastics, but the chemical mimics estrogen in the human body, first reported in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. Studies have linked the chemical to a host of health issues such as cancerreproductive problemsheart disease and neurological issues, though so far FDA officials consider BPA to be safe.

Like Us on Facebook

Researchers looked at 534 children who had at least two cavities and examined the social skills before and five years after they were filled. They found that children who received the BPA fillings experienced more emotional problems. Other fillings had no other effect on children's behavior.

"It was actually kind of a surprise that instead of seeing any possible adverse associations with amalgam, that the trends seem to go the other way and the children in the composite group seemed to have more problems," study author Nancy Maserejian, an epidemiologist at New England Research Institutes in Watertown, Mass., told HealthDay.

The changes were small, and parents may not notice it in their individual child, researchers said, but with a large enough sample size the change is apparent.

"On average, the difference in social behavior scores were very small and would probably not be noticed for each individual child," Maserejian said. "But imagine a huge group of children around the country; you'd probably notice a difference."

Dr. Burton Edelstein, a pediatric dentist and professor of dentistry at Columbia University, in New York City, told HealthDay that dentists need to consider going back to amalgam fillings, which contain mercury.

"This study raises enough concern about the alternative of amalgam to revisit the value of amalgam," he said.

In addition to these dental fillings, people become exposed to BPA from eating or drinking anything that's been stored in containers that use BPA, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found BPA-laced urine in 93 percent of residents tested between 2003 and 2004.

Various countries already banned BPA including Canada, the European Union and Turkey. Japan banned the chemical in can liners only. In the U.S., 10 states banned BPA from baby bottles.

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Sponsored From Around the Web

    ZergNet
Follow iScience Times
us on facebook RSS
 
us on google
 
Most Popular
INSIDE iScience Times
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet  Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)