Watch A Superbird Dive 150 Feet In 40 Seconds [VIDEO]

By Amir Khan on August 1, 2012 9:55 AM EDT

Cormorant
Researchers studying cormorants recently attached a camera to a bird's back in order to observe it in its natural habitat, but what they found astounded them (Photo: Creative Commons)

Researchers studying cormorants recently attached a camera to a bird's back in order to observe it in its natural habitat, but what they found astounded them. The researchers watched the bird dive deep into the ocean very quickly in order to feed on the ocean floor -- something they have never seen before on camera.

The bird, an imperial cormorant, dove 150 feet underwater in 40 seconds, and then spent the next 80 seconds scouring for food on the ocean floor. It eventually catches a snake-like fish before returning to the surface.

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The camera is attached to the birds back, so viewers get a view of the bird's head bobbing up and down on its amazing 120-second journey.

Researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society shot the footage in Patagonia, Argentina, which is a costal protected area where more than 3,500 cormorants live. The scientific team, led by Dr. Flavio Quintana, has been studying cormorants for more than a decade.

Imperial cormorants typically weigh between 4 and 8 pounds and grow up to 31 inches long. The feed on small fish and other species that live on the ocean floor, and have been observed diving up to 80 feet deep.

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