Big Chill, Not Big Bang, Created Universe According To New Theory

By Mo Mozuch on August 22, 2012 9:28 PM EDT

photo: NASA
photo: NASA

The Big Bang Theory might just get replaced by the Big Chill Theory. Physicists at the University of Melbourne in Australia believe the Big Bang was actually a phase change between an amorphous, fluid-like universe into the crystalline, solid universe we know today.  The change came because of a temperature decrease, similar to water creating ice. In the Big Chill, the "ice" in the analogy represents all three dimensions and time itself.

Like Us on Facebook

"Think of the early universe as being like a liquid," James Quach, lead author of the study published in the journal Physical Review D, said in a statement. "Then as the universe cools, it 'crystallises' into the three spatial and one time dimension that we see today. Theorized this way, as the universe cools, we would expect that cracks should form, similar to the way cracks are formed when water freezes into ice."

Looking for the "cracks" in the universe could explain a great deal on what it's made of.  The prevailing theories are based on Albert Einstein's assertion that space and time are continuous and flow smoothly. However, Quach and his team believe that, at very small scales, the universe is actually made up of tiny pieces.

"A new theory, known as Quantum Graphity, suggests that space may be made up of indivisible building blocks, like tiny atoms. These indivisible blocks can be thought about as similar to pixels that make up an image on a screen. The challenge has been that these building blocks of space are very small, and so impossible to see directly," Quach said.

The math in the published theory has been recognized as correct, but it will take physical experimentation to prove if the theory is true. Researchers believe that the defects formed during the crystallization of space-time are possible to find.  "Light and other particles would bend or reflect off such defects, and therefore in theory we should be able to detect these effects," said Andrew Greentree, a research team member and professor at the Royal Melbourne institute of Technology.

The questions surrounding the origin of the universe are larger than the questions surround the creation of humanity. Instead of asking "How did we get here?" researchers are asking "How did EVERYTHING get here?" Quach believes his work is the latest in a series of questions about the universe that goes back thousands of years.

"Ancient Greek philosophers wondered what matter was made of: was it made of a continuous substance or was it made of individual atoms?" he said. "With very powerful microscopes, we now know that matter is made of atoms."

What the universe is made of, so far, is lots of questions. 

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Sponsored From Around the Web

    ZergNet
Follow iScience Times
us on facebook RSS
 
us on google
 
Most Popular
INSIDE iScience Times
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet  Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)