Hurricane Isaac 2012: Landfall Expected Late Tuesday

Isaac 2012 Path Strangely Similar To Hurricane Katrina, 7 years ago, August 29

By Judy Feldman on August 27, 2012 10:50 AM EDT

Hurricane Isaac  (2000)
Hurricane Isaac 2012: Landfall Expected Late Tuesday (Photo: Wiki Commons)

Still considered a Tropical Storm,  Isaac currently has maximum and sustained winds of 65 mph (100 kph), which is only about 9 mph (14.5 kph) less than that which passes the definition of  hurricane threshold. And the storm is expected to strengthen into a hurricane over the next 24 hours. So-called wind shear has limited the storm's development today. Wind shear is what is happening when different  winds at different levels in the atmosphere are moving in different directions, which can hamper a storm's development. As of this update (7:05 EST)  it is anticipated that Isaac will eventually become a Category 2 Hurricane. 

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Isaac's eye has been  forecast to pass west of Tampa. But the path is not known for certain. What is weird is that Isaac is threatening to follow an eerily familiar path to that of Katrina, the monster storm that hit New Orleans 7 years ago this week. However it is not expected to grow to more than a category I. But much is still not known, as weather conditions continue to fluctuate.

Even if Tropical Isaac is not yet  labeled a Hurricane, he has been making big waves. He caused the Republican National Convention to cancel their Monday Morning Session.

As stated by NOAA's National Hurricane Center, "A turn toward the northwest is expected by Tuesday. The center of Isaac will move over the Eastern Gulf Of Mexico today and approach the northern gulf coast in the hurricane warning area on Tuesday". Landfall is expected late Tuesday or possibly Wednesday. "Maximum sustained winds are near to 65 MPH.100 KM/H...with higher gusts. Some strengthening is forecast during the next 48 hours and Isaac is expected to become a hurricane in a day or so."

Hurricane warnings have been issued for the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico, from Morgan City, Louisiana, east to Destin, Florida. Thousands of homeowners in the three states of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama were told early Monday to leave coastal homes. Governors in each of the three states declared an emergency. Alabama Governor Robert Bentley ordered certain mandatory evacuations.

As of the time of this posting, the still Tropical Storm Isaac is moving at 14 mph through the gulf, about 360 miles southeast of the mouth of the Mississippi River, '"packing maximum sustained winds of 65 mph", according to an Hurricane Advisor Center, and reported by CNN.

So far, the storm has hit Haiti, and caused the deaths of at least six people on Saturday.  Isaac has also hit at Cuba and the Florida Keys.

CNN meteorologist Dave Hennen reported  eerie similarities between Hurricane Katrina and Isaac.The forecast for Isaac and the one for Katrina in 2005 are almost identical, he said. "Hurricane Katrina went on to become a dangerous Category 5 hurricane in the central Gulf of Mexico," Hennen said. On August 29, 2005, Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast, killing roughly 1,800 people.

For a Monday morning news video discussion with a representative from The National Hurrican Center, about Isaac, go here.

For up to the minute updates on what is happening with Atlantic Tropical Storm Isaac or Hurricane Isaac, go to the National Weather Service National Hurricane Center, here.  

For tracking the path of Isaac, live, see here

For some interesting current and historical interactive storm trackers to watch, at msnbc, see here.

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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