Watch Felix Baumgartner's Jump: New POV Video From Head Cam Shows Descent From Space [VIDEO]

By Ian Kar on October 15, 2012 5:46 PM EDT

Felix Baumgartner
Felix Baumgartner stunned the world on Sunday when he set a world record by completing his Red Bull Stratos Jump. (Photo: Creative Commons)

Felix Baumgartner had a camera attached to his suit yesterday for his historic and record breaking flight from space. Now, you can see the point of view footage from a camera attached to Baumgartner himself.

Thanks to Gizmodo, you can see exactly what Felix Baumgartner saw from his decent from space last night. Now, you can experience what Felix Baumgartner went through when he dove towards earth, 24 miles in the sky.

The footage comes from a camera stored in his helmet (but, since you can see his head in the video, the camera was most likely stores his chest) that started recording the moment he jumped.

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The video is stunning...and nauseating. After Baumgartner breaks the sound barrier on his decent to earth, he stated spinning so rapidly that it was honestly hard for me to watch. I can only imagine how it was for him. According to Red Bull Stratos, at one point Baumgartner thought he would faint from the spinning as he felt himself breaking the speed of sound: "The exit was perfect but then I started spinning slowly. I thought I'd just spin a few times and that would be that, but then I started to speed up. It was really brutal at times. I thought for a few seconds that I'd lose consciousness. I didn't feel a sonic boom because I was so busy just trying to stabilize myself. We'll have to wait and see if we really broke the sound barrier. It was really a lot harder than I thought it was going to be.

IBTimes writes on the POV video, from a camera located in the suit Baumgartner wore for the mission. "By Monday, another POV video from the camera in the helmet of his 28-pound high-tech suit built by Worcester-based David Clark Co. was released on the Internet. The footage below shows his leap from the balloon 128,100 feet, or 24 miles, above New Mexico, and his free fall descent as a person from Mission Control narrates his speed."

Watch the video here:

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