Dog That Lost Snout Will Need To Be Tube Fed Says Vet [VIDEO]

By iScienceTimes Staff on October 17, 2012 12:55 PM EDT

Kabang arrives in the U.S. for treatment
photo: YouTube.com (Photo: YouTube)

Kabang, a heroic dog from the Philippines who lost her snout while saving two people from a speeding motorcycle, arrived at the University of California Davis last week to begin receiving treatment for the wound which removed Kabang's snout and most of her upper jaw.

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After an hour-long exam that included blood and urine tests, doctors concluded Kabang would need at least two surgeries over the next six weeks. One surgery would focus on dental work and the other would close the wound on her face. Dr. Michael Rubinstein, the clinical director for the New York City Humane Society, said that the primary concern for Kabang would be eating.

"With the upper jaw and nose gone the dog can still get air," he said. "My primary concern would be how she will eat. Without an upper jaw the animal will have to be tube fed."

Although he is not treating Kabang, Dr. Rubinstein also added that the risk of infection is another factor he would be concerned with. Kabang will still be able to detect smells because of olfactory nerves in the brain, but many of the sensors and receptors that are a crucial part of the smelling process were lost when the snout was removed in the accident. He explained that Kabang would need to undergo surgical grafting to repair the wound.

According to USA Today, Kabang's journey to the U.S. was the result of work done by Karen Kenngott, a critical care nurse from Buffalo, N.Y. A Facebook page titled 'Care For Kabang' already received over 11,000 likes. It directs users to the official website where they can make a donation towards Kabang's medical bills. UC Davis said in a statement that there are no plans to give Kabang a prosthetic snout or replace her jaw. She will also receive treatment for a vaginal tumor and heartworm. Her heartworm has not reached an advanced stage, and the tumor was caught early enough to warrant a "90 percent survival rate" from doctors.

"Kabang's treatment plan is being finalized to deal with the heartworm and TVT going forward. Both of these issues must be addressed before she is healthy enough for the dental and facial surgeries. That will take some time - possibly up to 6 months depending on how she responds to the treatments," doctors said in the statement.

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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