U.S. Government Attempted Flying Saucer Build Shortly After Roswell Incident: Plans Revealed

By Amir Khan on October 18, 2012 12:48 PM EDT

UFO
A secret report created by the U.S. government in 1956 detailing a program aiming to create a flying saucer has been unearthed by researchers at the National Declassification Center in College Park, Md. (Photo: Neil Carmichael)

A secret report created by the U.S. government in 1956 detailing a program aiming to create a flying saucer has been unearthed by researchers at the National Declassification Center in College Park, Md. The report, which has been under wraps for the last 56 years, details the secret Air Force program in a 114-page document.

"These records have been classified probably since their creation during the '50s," Neil Carmichael, director of the declassification review division at NDC, told Popular Mechanics. "It's like somebody went into somebody's office, emptied out a filing cabinet, stuck it in a box, sealed it, and sent it off to the federal records center. It was deemed permanently valuable at some point in its life and that's why we have it today."

Like Us on Facebook

The group posted the images last week on their website, and says this report is just the beginning.

"We have about 400 million pages to get through the executive order President Obama signed in 2009," Carmichael said. "I tell my techs, 'If you find anything interesting, let us know.'"

The secret program, which was estimated to cost $3.2 million in 1956, includes designs for a round, vertical takeoff aircraft that is described as a flying saucer. The aircraft, which includes an ejector seat, is powered by a jet engine designed to reach Mach 4 and more than 100,000 feet high.

"Six Armstrong Siddeley Viper turbo-jet s -- 1,900 lb. thrust, 22.0" overall diameter, 525 lb weight each -- are mounted radially in the wing, exhausting inwards; and used as gas generators to drive a pair of contra-rotating centrifugal impellers by means of a radial inflow turbine," the document says, according to Fox News.

However, the plan never got off the ground, as experts decided that the aircraft would never be stable enough to fly.

"The efficiency of the airframe at supersonic speed appears good and that of the engine reasonable, so that a long supersonic cruise range is also forecast," the document said. "[However,] as it gained in altitude, it would start to wobble uncontrollably."

Carmichael said  he and his team will continue to dig through old records, and hopefully will find out more about older government programs.

"I've been doing this for 20 years and it never ceases to amaze me what we find in the records," he said.

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Sponsored From Around the Web

    ZergNet
Follow iScience Times
us on facebook RSS
 
us on google
 
Most Popular
INSIDE iScience Times
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet  Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)