Hurricane Sandy: Five Reasons Why NYC Will Be Hardest Hit

By Staff Reporter on October 29, 2012 2:12 PM EDT

As Hurricane Sandy strengthens Monday morning, twelve states including Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maryland, Maine, North Carolina, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, Virginia, and Vermont, have all issued hurricane advisories on their homepage to provide the latest information for their residents.

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According to NBCNews forecasters, winds up to 90 mph will hit inland as the storm extends nearly 485 miles from its center. Not only are more than 10 million without any form of transportation, a number of power outages have already been reported including 2,100 New Jersey, 4,800 in Virginia, and a whopping 7,700 in Connecticut.

In total, FEMA estimates the potential of wind damage alone can cost the East Coast $3 billion. Factoring residential properties that are at risk of damage, the U.S. News estimates that the monetary figure can potentially elevate to a somber $88 billion.

While all the states located on the Eastern Coast should stay alert and well prepared, some cities stand to face significantly greater dangers than others.

Here are five reasons why New York City will come off worst from Hurricane Sandy:

(Photo: NOAA) Tropical Storm Force Wind Speed Probabilities 10/29/2012
(Photo: NOAA) Tropical Storm Force Wind Speed Probabilities 10/29/2012

1.) IMPACT: According to NOAA's the projections, the cyclone's path is directed in such a way that New Jersey and New York City will bear the brunt of Sandy's might. A purple color code representing 100-percent strength is apparently pointing towards a near-90-degree angle that can be identified as the intersect between the Jersey coastline and Long Island-- exactly where Manhattan Island is located.

Storm Surge NYC
Storm Surge NYC

2.) GEOGRAPHY: While Atlantic City and South Long Island will suffer from strong 4-8 feet wind surges, The Weather Channel predicts that the pockets of New York City harbors and waterways will cause storm surges generating waves as high as 11 feet tall to hit the city shores.

(Photo: MTA Via Flickr) Lenox Terminal @ 148th St. in Flood Prep
(Photo: MTA Via Flickr) Lenox Terminal @ 148th St. in Flood Prep

3.) ALTITUDE: New York City is a sea-level home for millions of residents. What's more, MTA has completely closed its sophisticated network of 660 miles of underground (and under sea-leve) track. The MTA Subway system serves as the main mode of mass transportation for the city. Major flooding and even salt water damage can spell catastrophe for the Subway lines.

(Photo: Reuters) New York Skyline
(Photo: Reuters) New York Skyline

4.) POPULATION AFFECTED: The most populous city in the United States, the brunt of Hurricane Sandy will threaten the livelihood of more than 8 million residents in New York City-- a population figure that greatly eclipses any other urban area along the Eastern seaboard.

(Photo: Weather Channel) Sandy Power Outages
(Photo: Weather Channel) Sandy Power Outages

5.) ECONOMIC IMPACT: According to The Weather Channel, 70 mph wind gusts threaten to topple trees in all areas indicated in red. Hitting cities including Boston, Philadelphia, Washington D.C., and Pittsburgh. What's more, damage to property and utilities are the utmost concern in the face of disaster.

According to The Atlantic, the New York City economy produces $3.5 billion in gross metropolitan product. When New York City was struck with Hurricane Irene last year, the Wall Street Journal reported that $8 billion in damages were estimated due to business interruptions alone.

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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