Hurricane Sandy-Ravaged Areas Face Threat Of Impending Nor'easter Storm

By Staff Reporter on November 3, 2012 5:35 PM EDT

(Photo: NOAA) mid-week storm
(Photo: NOAA) mid-week storm

For many Americans along the Eastern seaboard, Hurricane Sandy was a loud and clear reminder of just how weak and helpless we are in the face of mother nature's wrath.

With many families still suffering from flooding and power outages that will possibly extend for another week, NOAA has reported a new development in weather models that are suggesting a low pressure front to develop from the Southeast or mid-Atlantic coastline by late Tuesday. Its trajectory is pointing north, suggesting that high winds, a new rainstorm, and possibly even flood risk, will threaten the tri-state area.

Like Us on Facebook

According to the Washington Post, the four primary global models including the GFS, the Canadian, the UKMet, and the European (EURO) are all displaying ominous signs of a storm formation. According to the GFS and the Canadian, the storm is forming farther of coast and will not reach Washington, D.C. However, the European and UKMet data suggest that rain in the D.C. area could even turn into accumulating snow by Wednesday night.

While the coming storm is in no way nearly as devastating as Hurricane Sandy, the threat hinges on just how vulnerable the current state of the New Jersey and New York coast is. Via nj.com, forecaster Mark Delisi of the National Weather Service of Mount Holly reports, "If the forecast track doesn`t change spatially, this would have us forecasting a relatively slow-moving nor`easter sometime in the Tuesday night through Thursday night time frame. Heavy rain, strong winds, tidal flooding and the possibility of some snow northwest are in play. This system does not look as potent as Sandy, but (a nor’easter of this strength) moving up near the coast would be significant.”

The winds are particularly mega. Speeds of up to 50 miles per hour are predicted during the peak of the storm, no doubt hindering New York and New Jersey's recovery progress and might even cause further outages in some areas. What's more, Flood barriers that once protected low-lying neighborhoods have already been compromised after Sandy's destruction. Inland snow also threatens to slow the time it takes first responders to reach parts of the state.

Because forecasts are still premature and many factors can change the story come Wednesday, we suggest residents along the East Coast to keep a close eye on local weather data to learn more about what you can do to prepare for the storm. What's more, we highly advise readers to reach out to family and friends affected by Sandy that may not be aware of the second storm front.

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Sponsored From Around the Web

    ZergNet
Follow iScience Times
us on facebook RSS
 
us on google
 
Most Popular
INSIDE iScience Times
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet  Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)