NFL Cheerleader To Shave Head For Cancer Awareness: How To Donate To #Chuckstrong Campaign

By iSports Times Staff Reporter on November 13, 2012 5:56 PM EST

megan m.
Indianapolis Colts cheerleader Megan M. announced that she'll shave her head if the franchise is able to raise $10,000 for leukemia research. (Photo: colts.com)

Indianapolis Colts Head Coach Chuck Pagano stepped away from his job earlier this year in order to spend more time focusing on his battle with leukemia. The news hit the team hard, and the players have been playing with a heavy heart ever since his departure. In an attempt to generate more awareness about leukemia, Indianapolis Colts players have begun shaving their heads. Now, one of the team's beautiful cheerleaders may get in on the action.

The Indianapolis Colts have announced through the team mascot's Twitter account that cheerleader Megan M. will shave her head if the franchise is able to raise $10,000 for leukemia research by the Colts vs. Bills game on Nov. 25. The brunette bombshell eagerly awaits the opportunity to shave her head to show her support for Chuck Pagano.

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Prior to the announcement, 25 Colts players had already shaved their head to show their support for coach Chuck Pagano. Megan M accepted the challenge on Sunday, and now Colts mascot Blue is asking for donations to the Chuckstrong fund on the Colts' website. Money raised through the Chuckstrong fund will benefit research at the IU Health Simon Cancer Center in Indianapolis.

In addition to the Chuckstrong fund, Colts fans have been given the opportunity to shave their head for free at Great Clips locations around Indiana in order to show their support for leukemia research. For each fan that visits a Great Clips location to shave their head, $10 will be given to the Chuckstrong fund. To find participating Great Clips locations, visit the official Indianapolis Colts website.

Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects bone marrow, blood cells, lymph nodes and other parts of the lymphatic system. According to the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program, Leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma were expected to cause the deaths of an estimated 53,010 people in the United States in 2011. The diseases were expected to account for almost 10 percent of deaths from cancer in 2011. For more information visit the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society website.

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