Girl Slept For 64 Days: 'Sleeping Beauty Syndrome' Diagnosed In Nicole Delian; What Is It? [VIDEO]

By Melissa Siegel on November 19, 2012 2:39 PM EST

Sleeping Beauty Girl
Nicole Delian suffers from a rare neurological disorder that causes her to sleep for days or even weeks at a time. (Photo: Video Screenshot / Jeff Probst Show)

A Pennsylvania girl slept for 64 days straight.

Nicole Delian, 17, has a rare neurological condition called Kleine-Levin Syndrome, more commonly known as "Sleeping Beauty Syndrome." The ailment causes her to sleep between 18 and 19 hours a day, according to the Huffington Post. At times, the girl has slept for 32 or 64 days straight, waking only to eat. Even then, she remained in a sleepwalking state, barely cognizant of what was going on around her.

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The long sleeping episodes caused Delian to miss many important events, according to KDKA. She slept through Thanksgiving, Christmas and even a family trip to Disney World before doctors could determine what was wrong.

Indeed, the "Sleeping Beauty Syndrome" took a long time to properly diagnose. Nicole Delian and her family had to see doctors at various hospitals receiving the official diagnosis. The process took around 25 months and included false diagnoses of diseases like West Nile virus and epilepsy, according to Chartiers Valley Patch. Some even felt that Nicole Delian was faking the illness for attention.

Since the diagnosis, Delian has been taking medicine to help treat her illlness. She has not had a long sleeping episode since March but is still afraid it could happen again.

Kleine-Levin Syndrome is incredibly rare, according to the Huffington Post. Only 1,000 people worldwide have been diagnosed with the disease.

According to the Kleine-Levin Syndrome Foundation website, the condition that afflicted this girl who slept for 64 days is most common in adolescents. Even when patients are awake, they appear spacey and disoriented and can complain of lack of energy or apathy. They also can be hypersensitive to noise and light and sometimes experience food cravings.

Symptoms can appear for extended periods of time and then reappear years later with no warning. The condition often takes about four years to properly diagnose, according to the website.

 This girl who slept for 64 days appeared on "The Jeff Probst Show" recently with her family to talk about her condition.

Her father, Harry, described on the show what the family does after Nicole Delian wakes up from a long sleeping episode.

"First of all, we try to figure out where she left off, and then from there we kind of try to gently fill her in," he said. "It really bothers her when she finds out that she missed Christmas again, or she missed Thanksgiving, or her birthday. It's devastating for her. So we try to ease her into it easily. And we actually keep her home from school another day or two, because while she's getting over the shock, she doesn't need the barrage of all the friends saying, '"Where you been for the last two months? What's wrong?"'

You can watch the full video of this interview below.

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