Twins Fighting In Womb: Watch Video Of Astounding Fetal Brawl Here [MRI FOOTAGE]

By Staff Reporter on December 2, 2012 3:25 PM EST

Twins
Twins fighting in womb video goes viral. Watch video of fetal brawl here. (Photo: Youtube Screenshot)

Twins fighting in womb was always the stuff of cheesy penny mysteries, but thanks to a new video that you can watch released by London's Center for Fetal Care, fetal feuds are more common than you think. A live MRI scan shows the first fight that a pair of twins will have in their life-- and unfortunately for their parents, a tradition of brawling begins prenatally, before the twins were even born.

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The twins' fighting in womb was revealed by an advanced MRI scan which the London Center for Fetal Care typically reserves to study, observe, and analyze twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, more commonly referred to within the scientific community as TTTS. This syndrome is typically characterized by one of the twins taking blood from the other while still inside the mother's womb. This very advanced MRI scan has only recently been developed by doctors, exciting them by giving them a new means to study how twins interact inside the womb.

Even if it means having a front row seat for twins's fighting in womb, doctors are breaking out the proverbial popcorn. Never before have internal interactions between fetuses been observed by doctors and scientists with this much depth or clarity. The implications of this groundbreaking development could change the way that we diagnose the health and behavioral well-being of single fetuses or the pairs of them belonging to lucky parents. Said Dr. Maris Taylor-Clark of the London Center of the extraordinary benefits of this new research: "We haven't really been able to see before, in such real-time, complete pictures, how twins interact."

These interactions, which range from twins fighting in womb to moving around absent of engaging one another, has never before been achieved in the world of science. Continued Dr. Marisa Taylor Clark, "What this lets us do is see their positions in relation to each other and how much space they occupy, and how they might move around and push each other out of the way, so that's something that you can snapshots of on ultrasound, and small parts of it, but you don't get the view of the whole room, as it were, the room being the womb."

The video that has gone viral of the twins' fighting in womb uses a medical technique called "oversampling," which the London Center contends is much more detailed than what regular MRIs typically show. According to Dr. Taylor-Clark, oversampling concerns itself with much thinner slices of the brain, taking pictures as skinny as one or two millimeters, and overlapping those. That way, even if the fetus moves, the brain has been "oversampled" so that a 3-D volume of the brain can be reconstructed without missing out on any of the key regions.

This means that these new fetal MRIs can pick up on details of brain injury resulting from twins' fighting in womb so much earlier than ultrasounds can. Still, in spite of this new achievement, Dr. Taylor-Clark cannot recommend this new "oversampling" technology for an overwhelming majority of pregnant women, citing the fact that MRI scanning is a "very specialized technique" and that most women have healthy pregnancies with healthy babies. What this means is that new technology like this will pick up on tiny anomalies that doctors won't be able to interpret, causing what she believes to be needless stress to the mother.

It's gotten so advanced that, as of last November, British researchers reported that they could distinguish yawning from what they term "non-yawn mouth opening" by studying the footage.

To watch the video of the twins' fighting in womb, click below to take a look at what fetal MRI oversampling reveals:

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