Fishermen Cannibals: Alexander Abdullaev And Alexei Gradulenko Eat Two Friends In Three Months Say Police

Escape From Hospital After Being Questioned By Police

By iScienceTimes Staff on December 5, 2012 1:34 PM EST

Siberia
Siberia is a cold, harsh place when winter sets in. (Photo: Reuters)

Two Siberian fishermen resorted to cannibalism to survive three months in the harsh wilderness along the Sutam River, say Russian authorities. Alexander Abdullaev, 37, and Alexei Gradulenko, 35, are the two fishermen cannibals accused of murdering friends in order to survive the grueling -22F temperatures after their Jeep was swallowed by floodwaters. Although the fishermen cannibals denied it, police strongly suspect their friends were eaten based on evidence found at the site where the men were rescued.

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"We suspect, the two survivors could have killed and eaten their friend just because of hunger," a police source told the Siberian Times. "But both deny they have anything to do with his death. Looking at the body parts found at the spot, we clearly saw cuts. It means the body was hacked to pieces."

Another investigator told the paper "what we found were chopped human bones, fragments of a skull and a bloodstained chunk of ice. It's clear that this person did not die of his own accord."

Adding to the incriminating evidence against the fishermen cannibals is their escape rom a local hospital after being interrogated by police. According to the Siberian Times story, the men snuck out of the hospital before receiving any treatment for frostbite or malnourishment.

The fisherman cannibals claim they survived on moss and animal skins while searching for help. They also found a few empty cabins and helped themselves to whatever food they found inside. In one confirmed incident, they left a note and some money explaining their situation.

Although the men were stranded at the beginning of August, they didn't get reported missing until Abdullaev's sister contacted authorities in November. She said she waited so long because of her confidence in her brother's ability to survive in the wilderness.

'The taiga [forest] is his element, he can live there for a month or two, and he was not alone. He was with friends from Saratov," she reportedly told police in November.

So far police have only uncovered the remains of one other man, and DNA testing is pending so it is unknown which of the fishermen cannibals friends authorities found. A second body has not been located, but authorities believe based on the forensic evidence of the first body that the missing man was likely murdered and cannibalized as well. 

What do you think? Should the fishermen cannibals be tried for murder? Or do survival rules trump law and order in life or death situations?

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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