Mayan Apocalypse Myths; 5 Events To Watch For

By Mo Mozuch on December 18, 2012 6:03 PM EST

Mayan Temple
Doomsday phobia is causing people around the world to take heed of the Mayan 2012 prophecy. (Photo: Reuters)

Mayan Apocalypse myths are getting a lot more attention now that December 21, 2012 is approaching. It's been a big story for a few years, and a few people believe it to be true. And by few, we mean one out of every ten people on the planet, roughly 65 million. One in seven believe the world will end in their lifetimes.

"Whether they think it will come to an end through the hands of God, or a natural disaster or a political event, whatever the reason, one in seven thinks the end of the world is coming," said Keren Gottfried, research manager at IPOS Global Public Affairs, according to Reuters.

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So which will it be? God? Disaster? Political Event? We examine five of the possible outcomes for the Mayan Apocalypse myths.

5. Time Collapses

According to William Dankenbring, author of "2012 - Return of Quetzalcoatl, and the Wrath of Satan" claims that that the Mayan Apocalypse myths are related to their worship of the Milky Way and that a doorway to a celestial crossroads will open on Dec. 21. It represents the end of an Age and the start of a new calendar cycle. The Mayans wrote that when this occurs "time would collapse."

So what happens if the Mayan Apocalypse myth is right and time collapses? No one is really sure, since we have a negligible understanding of what time is or how it even works. But since everything needs time to exist we can assume that time collapsing would be bad. Like, crossing-the-streams bad.

4. Aliens Start A War

Some Mayan Apocalypse myths center around visits form extraterrestrials, which go hand-in-hand with the theories that the Mayans were frequently visited by extraterrestrials. And the Mayan Apocalypse myths surrounding end-of-the-world scenarios coincide with the conspiracy of a reptilian master race. For those not in the know, some people believe a reptilian master race lives underground and is responsible for many of the UFOs seen on Earth.

The Mayan Apocalypse myth suggests that they predicted the rise of this reptilian race on Dec 21, and that they will reveal themselves as our true masters and go about enslaving humanity thanks to the secret shadow government they've created over the past 500 years or so. The "new era" referred to in some translations of Mayan Apocalypse myths could mean that we will be living in an era of enslavement, and that our reptilian masters tipped off the Mayans before going underground.

3. Quetzalcoatl Returns

Mayan Apocalypse myths might also be referring to the return of one of their gods, Quetzalcoatl. The prevailing theory is that Quetzalcoatl was an alien from the Pleiades. Described as a robed Caucasian man with blond hair, Quetzalcoatl is recognized as a savior among a number of cultures in the North and South Americas who spoke of a bearded man who traveled among the tribes to spread peace about 2,000 years ago. Legend has it that he warned the Mayans to beware another Caucasian man who would force them into slavery and make them worship a false religion. That warning proved correct when the Mayans welcomed Cortes the infamous Spanish Conquistador as the return of Quetzacoatl. Cortes got to work enslaving them and forcing them to be Christians.

Of all the Mayan Apocalypse myth, this one actually has the happiest ending. Quetzacotal returns to Earth not as a man, but as an energy that will reshape civilization and usher in an era of oneness among all humanity. There is a darkhorse candidate for returning Mayan god called Bolon Yotke who will return to guide humanity into the next era. Whether that guiding is through social euphoria or apocalyptic destruction is anyone's guess.

2. The Sun Kills Us All

This Mayan Apocalypse myth got so big it had to take scientists at NASA to try and debunk it. The myth was that the sun would basically freak out and emit a huge solar storm that would obliterate life on Earth. Some slightly more reasonable Mayan Apocalypse myth believers think that the Sun will simply destroy all of our satellites leading to global hysteria as civilization turns back the clock to the primitive societies before satellites, like 1950s America. You know 1950s America. That horrific wasteland of death and destruction that absolutely no one ever gets nostalgic about or refers to as the greatest period in American history.

1. Earth's Magnetic Poles Reverse Leading To ... Something Bad?

This is probably the only Mayan Apocalypse myth that is terrifying to birds and whales. Because, outside of the animals that use the poles for migration virtually no life on Earth would be affected whatsoever if the magnetic poles reversed. It sounds like a scary thing, 'magnetic pole reversal,' but the geological facts of the matter are that the Earth has gone through this before. And unless we're all having one collective dream, the Earth is still here. So are birds and whales and people. The radiation from the Sun won't cook the planet if the poles reverse since we still have an atmosphere that provides the same amount of radiation protection as 13 feet of concrete. Also, these reversals happen gradually over thousands of years because the Earth doesn't operate within the confines of minutes or seconds. So no one will wake up Dec. 21 and see all the birds flying into buildings and compasses spinning madly.

Still worried that the Mayan Apocalypse myths might come true. Then enjoy this movie released by NASA (prematurely, due to suicide threats) entitled "Why The World Didn't End Yesterday."

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