Alien Space Cathedral In New Mexico Actually Scientology Bunker

By iScienceTimes StaffS on December 31, 2012 12:13 PM EST

Los Angeles Scientology Center
This L.A. Scientology center is a lot more above ground than a rumored bunker discovered by reporter John Sweeney in the New Mexico desert. (Photo: Reuters)

An alien space cathedral built by scientologists in the New Mexico desert is more fortress than church, according to famed Scientology whistleblower John Sweeney. Sweeney famously confronted Scientologists for a 2007 episode of the BBC news program 'Panorama.' Sweeney traveled to the site to research a new book, 'Church of Fear: Inside the Weird World of Scientology.'

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The alien space cathedral is mostly built underground and protected by titanium blast doors built to withstand a nuclear blast. Why? Because the site reportedly houses the original writings of Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard, and devotees want to protect his works so that the religion can flourish if (or when?) a nuclear apocalypse devastates humanity. The alien space cathedral also boasts two large crop circle-type formations that are to be used as navigation points for finding the texts.

"Its vault houses the lectures of church founder L Ron Hubbard on gold discs locked in titanium caskets sealed with argon. The cathedral is H-bomb proof, protected by three 5,000lb stainless steel airlocks," Sweeney wrote in an excerpt published by The Sun. "Experts say the weird signs on top of the mountain will guide Clears, (high-ranking Scientologists) returning from space to find Mr. Hubbard's works after a nuclear Armageddon wipes out humanity."

Sweeney tried to take a tour of the alien space cathedral along with former member Marc Headley, a former church member who wrote a tell-all expose on the church titled 'Blown For Good: Behind The Iron Curtain Of Scientology.' The pair made it as far as a security gate near the alien space cathedral. An intercom sat at the end of miles of dirt road leading to the site, but the pair was turned away without explanation.

Among the reveal Headley makes in his book is the scam surrounding Scientology's use of E-meters. The church uses the E-meters to measure electrical energy around members, and recommends everyone keep two in their home. The devices cost $40 to manufacture, but are sold for $4,000 a piece.

Sweeney also claims that he was harassed by the church in a series of late night phone calls after returning to his hotel that night, and that when he was investigating the church in 2007 it hired private investigators to follow his every move.

What do you think? Is scientology just a money-making fraud? Or is it a legitimate religion that deserves the equality afforded to Christianity or Islam? Let us know in the comments section.

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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