Woman Dies On Plane Traveling From Brazil: Was Death A Homicide?

By Staff Reporter on January 2, 2013 5:24 PM EST

American Airline
An American Airlines flight was grounded in Houston after a 25-year-old female passenger was found dead. (Photo: Creative Commons)

A 25-year-old woman on American Airline's Brazil-Dallas flight was found dead this morning under suspicious circumstances.

According to Fox News American Airlines flight No. 962 from Sao Paolo made an emergency landing in Houston to provide the woman will medical attention. Logs indicate that the flight departed from Sao Paolo's GRU airport at 1:12 a.m. before it abruptly to Houston's IAH at 6:34 a.m. The woman was still alive but visibly under distress when she was discovered. Unfortunately, she died before the plane could make the landing.

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The airline was careful not to reveal the identify of the woman or the circumstances surrounding her death. Here is the first official statement that American Airlines released:

American Airlines flight 962 today from Sao Paolo (GRU) to Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) diverted to Houston (IAH) because of a medical emergency. We can't provide any information about the ill passenger, but we can provide details about the flight. AA962 departed GRU at 1:12 a.m. and diverted to IAH at 6:34 a.m. It left IAH at 9:05 a.m. and landed at DFW at 10:25 a.m. It was a Boeing 777 with 220 passengers and a crew of 14.

Pursuing the incident, the Harris County Institute for Forensic Sciences confirmed that the woman was not reported ill nor under the care of a physician. While it was also noted that the woman's body showed no signs of trauma, homicide detectives responded to the incident and worked with Houston police in the investigation. An autopsy is scheduled for tomorrow.

The Houston Police Department also took statements from the 220 passengers and the crew onboard the plane.

Further shrouding the circumstances surrounding the victim, the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil, is notoriously dangerous for its deadly mass drug wars.

According to the Guardian, 140 people were murdered in Sao Paulo over drug related conflicts over the course of just half of the month of November.

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