NYC Subway Deaths Haunt Operators As New Questions Are Left Unanswered

By IScience Times Staff Reporter on January 4, 2013 2:20 PM EST

subway
It's not just the families of victims in NYC subway deaths that can't erase the images from their minds. It's also the train operators, who replay the incidents again and again in their minds. (Photo: Reuters)

As Dana Ferrari's family tries to come to terms with the horrific NYC subway death that took the life of the 28-year-old N.J. woman on New Year's Eve, a train operator told The New York Times the other side of the story: the one that comes from inside the train's control booth.

"As cruel as it makes it sound, for the individual [who dies the story is] over," Curtis Tate, an operator who was running a train when it struck someone in 1992, told the paper. "It's just beginning for the train operator."

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Though three recent deaths - two homicides, and one mysterious incident - in the last two months seemed unusual, 55 people died in New York from train-related incidents in 2012. And at around 5:00 a.m. on January 1, 2013, 28-year-old Dana Ferrari inexplicably laid down on the tracks at West 34th Street. Soon after she was struck by a northbound No. 2 train.

Now family and friends are trying to understand why the pediatrician's office employee, who was engaged to Blake Pupo, would suddenly disappear in the middle of a Phish concert. Ferrari literally seemed to vanish into thin air. Pupo went to the restroom for a few minutes, and when he returned his fiancée was nowhere to be found.

"[Blake] is a mess," she told the New York Post. "We'd like to have more answers. How did she get into the train station?"

Ferrari's sister is baffled as to why someone who seemed so happy would lay down on train tracks. At midnight everything seemed fine, Leslie said. Her sister even sent her a text message that said: "Happy new year! i love you."

For train operator Tracy Moore, all of the NYC subway deaths have caused pain and confusion, too. In December 2005, as her train was entering the station, she spotted a man standing on the platform. He was short - around 5-foot-3, as she remembered - and very well-dressed. Soon she saw him jump onto the tracks. But it was too late for her to halt the train.

Moore took off from work and soon turned to sleep aids like Ambien. But the nightmares continued. "I was always seeing it, you know?" Moore, 45, told The New York Times.

Leslie Ferrari likely has images in her mind, too. But for Moore and Tate the view is from the other side.

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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