Mother Saves Daughter From Python Attack In Australia [VIDEO]

By Staff Reporter on January 7, 2013 3:27 PM EST

Python
An Australian mother wrestles a six-foot python off of her 2-year-old daughter (Photo: Creative Commons)

Tess Guthrie of New South Wales, Australia, was abruptly awaken by her pet cat that was hissing loudly at an intruder. As it turns out, a six-foot python has coiled itself around the arms of Guthrie's two-year baby daughter.

Distraught, Guthrie recalled, "I heard the cat hissing on the bed, which is what woke me up in the first place. I thought it was a dream when I saw the python wrapped around Zara and I didn't think it was real."

Desperate to wrestle the snake off of her daughter, Guthrie's efforts caused the snake to retaliate and coil even tighter around her daughter. The python even began to bite at the daughter as well.

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Guthrie described the incident, "On the third time [it was biting down on her] I grabbed the snake on the head and I pulled her and the snake apart from each other. In my head I was just going through this unbelievable terror, and my thought was that it was going to actually kill her at first, because it was wrapped so tight."

The 2-year-old girl was promptly treated at a local hospital and treated for the bites. Thankfully, pythons are non-poisonous and the girl was released without major injuries.

According to Tex Tillis of Tex's Snake Removal's, the snake was likely looking for warmth rather than a food. The snake probably acted aggressively in reaction to hostilities.

Tillis said, "Pythons, underneath their bottom lip have a row of sensors which evolution has equipped them with to see the world in infrared. In the dark, baby and mother sleeping in the bed would look like a lump of heat."

The snake was released 3 miles away from the home.

Be sure to take a look at Tess Gusthrie's interview on the frightening incident:

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