Ambien Warning: How Much Of The Sleeping Pill Can You Take Without A Problem? [VIDEO]

By IScience Times Staff Reporter on January 10, 2013 8:11 PM EST

Ambien
The FDA has issued an alarming Ambien warning, saying that current recommended dosages are way too high for driving and other activities. They are highly concerned about what they call the "morning-after" effect. (Photo: Reuters)

A scary Ambien warning was issued by the Food and Drug Administration on Thursday asking producers of the extremely popular sleeping pill to lower the current recommended doses. The news that suggested Ambien doses are currently too high is alarming countless Americans who rely on Ambien, Edluar or Zolpimist to get at least seven or eight hours of sleep per night.

The concern among officials at the FDA is that high levels of zolpidem, which causes drowsiness, remain in the bloodstream long after users have gotten up and started their days. As a result, the FDA says, high doses of Ambien can greatly affect cognitive skills and the ability to drive safely.

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Anyone who has used a sleep aid - whether over-the-counter or prescribed - can describe the sensation of waking up in a fog. That's precisely what the FDA is trying to prevent. FDA workers say that lowering doses of Ambien will greatly reduce traces in the bloodstream the next morning. Additionally, the FDA said, the dosages should be lower for women than they are for men.

They say the dosage of Ambien for women should be lowered to 5 milligrams from 10 milligrams for immediate-release products and to 6.25 milligrams from 12.5 milligrams for extended-release products. They also caution that the extended-release pills carry a far greater risk of cognitive impairment and problems with basic functions.

New labels for Ambien, Edluar and Zolpimist will state that doctors should consider a lower dose for men, as well. The FDA also urges doctors to talk to patients about what they call "morning-after" effects, explaining that patients can become groggy or somewhat dazed if dosages are too high.

"Patients should also read the medication guides and understand the benefits and risks of these drugs," Dr. Ellis Unger of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research said. "We believe that by lowering these doses, we can decrease the side effects that happen the morning after."

The FDA study was conducted by analyzing findings from a large driving simulation.

Watch the video below to get more information on the dangers associated with high Ambien doses...

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