Python On Plane Wing; Watch Real Life Snake On A Plane [VIDEO]

By iScienceTimes Staff on January 11, 2013 9:47 AM EST

Python on plane wing
A python on a plane wing showed Qantas passengers what happens when snakes get on a plane. They die. (Photo: Reuters)

Somewhere, Samuel L. Jackson's phone is blowing up right now ...

A python on a plane wing has sparked a real-life 'Snakes on a Plane' scenario on a Qantas flight QF191 in Australia. Passengers discovered the python on the plane wing about halfway through the Papua New Guinea-bound flight out of Queensland. Here is a video of the python on a plane wing:

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Qantas officials reported that the python on the plane wing, a nine-foot-long scrub python, did not interfere with the mechanics of the aircraft or endanger passengers or crew in any way.

''It appears as though the snake has initially crawled up inside the landing bay, maybe housed himself in there, and then crawled into the trailing ledge flap assembly,'' said the president of the Australian Licensed Aircraft Engineers Association Paul Cousins.

The plane, however, turned out to be lethal for the python. The python took a one-way trip on the plane wing, unable to survive the 500 plus mph winds and 10 degrees Fahrenheit temperatures (snakes are cold-blooded, after all). When the plane landed in Port Moresby, crew discovered the python on the plane wing had died.

"I felt quite sad for it really," passenger Robert Weber told the Sydney Morning Herald. "For the remainder of the trip he was trying to pull himself back into the plane. There was no panic. At no time did anyone stop to consider there might be others [snakes] on board."

Passengers were captivated by the python on the plane wing and his life-and-death struggle. Reports indicate the python was secure for most of the trip, but at some point the wind caught the python and began battering it against the wing of the plane. Passengers reported seeing blood spatters across the engine, and the python on the plane wing clung to life for most of the trip.

"We have never heard of this happening before,'' A Qantas spokeswoman told SMH.

It could happen again, given the large number of scrub pythons that live in the region, as well as the airport's proximity to a large swath of scrubland.

''They're common in north Queensland," said Rick Shine, a snake expert at the University of Sydney told SMH.  "They're ambush predators and if there are rodents anywhere nearby, they'll most likely be in the vicinity. They often find their way into tight ceiling spaces in houses, although I've never heard of one on a plane until now.''

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