Full Moon January 26th, 2013: Ten Facts You Probably Didn’t Know About Full Moons!

By Megan Schaefer on January 26, 2013 10:49 AM EST

Full moon, lunar eclipse, myth, science
Full moon will occur January 26th, 2013. (Photo: Reuters)

full moon will occur tonight (January 26th, 2013 at approximately 11:38 PM) for those who live in The United States. Although the full moon happens at the same moment everyplace around the world, our dates and time will differ due to our time zones.

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full moon is a lunar phase that occurs when the moon is on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun. It has many different names depending on the month it occurs in:

After the December solstice:
January - Old Moon, or Moon After Yule

February - Snow Moon, Hunger Moon, or Wolf Moon
March - Sap Moon, Crow Moon or Lenten Moon

After the March equinox:

April - Grass Moon, or Egg Moon

May - Planting Moon, or Milk Moon
June - Rose Moon, Flower Moon, or Strawberry Moon

After the June solstice:
July - Thunder Moon, or Hay Moon
August - Green Corn Moon, or Grain Moon
September - Fruit Moon, or Harvest Moon

After the September equinox:
October - Harvest Moon, or Hunter's Moon
November - Hunter's Moon, Frosty Moon, or Beaver Moon
December -Moon Before Yule, or Long Night Moon

But there's also more than a scientific aspect of the full moon. Many believe in the folklore that the full moon offers a night of temporal insanity! For centuries the myth of a full moon was people became crazy leading to suicide, arson, violent crimes, labor, epileptic seizures and sleepwalking.

People believe that moon phases do affect our human behavior like the way it affects tides. If the phases of the moon could cause a bulge in the Earth's crust then surely it could affect humans who are made of sixty percent of water.

Most scientists have determined that even if statistics show an incline in bag behavior on days of the full moon, there's no correlation or consistency.

Here are ten facts about the full moon you probably didn't know:

1.     The full moon occurs every 29.5 days; the duration of one complete lunar eclipse.

2.     The chanes of being bitten by a dog are twice as high during a full moon according toa  study at Bradford Royal Infirmary, which reviewed 1, 621 cases of dog bites between 1997 and 1999. However, a study at the University of Sydney in Australia concluded there was no identifiable relationship.

3.     The only month that can occur without a full moon is February.

4.     A full Moon is considered unlucky if it occurs on a Sunday but lucky on a Monday or moon day.

5.     The honeymoon is named after the full moon in June. As it fell between the planting and harvesting of crops this was traditionally the best month to get married.

6.     Renaissance artists traditionally depicted the moon as a crescent rather than in its full phase.

7.     It is only during a full moon that the dark side of the moon - the hemisphere on the opposite side to the sun - is completely dark.

8.     The female menstrual cycle has long been linked to the full phase of the moon. One theory is that prehistoric men were more likely to go hunting during their womenfolk's period because of taboos associated with blood. The most profitable time to hunt was during the full moon and the best way to convince the men to return with food was with the prospect of sex.

9.     The full moon may appear round, but is actually shaped like an egg with the pointed end facing earth.

10.   The moon is 10 times brighter when it is full than when it is in a quarter phase.

So those of you celebrating your full moon on Sunday make sure you stay away from dogs!

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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