Winter Storm Nemo: Amazing NASA Image of Superstorm, East Coast from Space [PHOTO]

By iScience Times Staff Reporter on February 8, 2013 7:02 PM EST

winter storm nemo
The Winter Storm Nemo photo from space is astounding. The entire East Coast of the United States is covered by a large cloud. (Photo: nasa.gov)

Winter Storm Nemo -- the name given to the super storm that's being created in the skies of the Northeast coast -- has finally started to develop above New York City, New Jersey and New England. Scientists were convinced that New York City stood a chance of getting hit by snowfall as high as 30 feet over the weekend. Predictions since original announcements have tapered tremendously.

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The Winter Storm Nemo photo from space is absolutely astounding. It shows the gigantic weather winter storm in its entirety. There's a thick cloud of smoke that basically stretches from beyond Chicago toward the eastern seaboard and past New York City.

NASA's GOES-13 satellite was able to get great photos of Winter Storm Nemo. New England is expected to get up to 3 feet of snow according to the National Weather Service. The NWS also issued Blizzard warning from New York City to main.

Here's what NASA said about the super storm:

Powerful Nor'easter Coming Together

A massive winter storm is coming together as two low pressure systems are merging over the U.S. East Coast. A satellite image from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on Feb. 8 shows a western frontal system approaching the coastal low pressure area.

The satellite image, captured at 9:01 a.m. EST, shows clouds associated with the western frontal system stretching from Canada through the Ohio and Tennessee valleys, into the Gulf of Mexico. The comma-shaped low pressure system located over the Atlantic, east of Virginia, is forecast to merge with the front and create a powerful nor'easter. The National Weather Service expects the merged storm to move northeast and drop between two to three feet of snow in parts of New England.

The National Weather Service has announced several storm warnings and winter storm warnings along the east coast of the United Sates. Coastal areas from Boston northward, residents are beginning to prepare for flooding. Wind speeds of up to 70 mph are expected to drive up water significantly higher than normal. Some reports suggest that water may rise up to four feet higher than usual.

"The heaviest snow totals by early Sunday morning are expected in New England from coastal Maine to Connecticut, as well as parts of Upstate New York, where over one foot of snow is expected! Some locations, particularly in coastal New England, may top two feet of storm total snow!" reports Weather.com.

Most news outlets agree with the reporters from the Weather Channel. "The snow is expected to start Friday morning, with the heaviest amounts falling at night and into Saturday. Wind gusts could top 60 mph. Widespread power failures were feared, along with flooding in coastal areas still recovering from Superstorm Sandy in October," reports CBS News.

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