Siblings Find, Return $13K: How Were Ryan and Katie Moi Rewarded?

By Jason Van Hoven on February 15, 2013 2:03 PM EST

One might think that if a pair of siblings found $13K, they'd disagree on what to do with the money.

But not Ryan and Katie Moi of Eugene, Ore.

They have become the talk of their town lately as the rare siblings that found and returned $13K without hesitation amid their own struggles ... and got rewarded for it, too.

Ryan and Katie Moi were driving down Coburg Road in Eugene on Monday afternoon when they saw a blue bank deposit bag in the road, according to the Register-Guard. Katie slowed to avoid hitting the bag and then pulled over. Ryan jumped out and got the bag and opened it up, revealing a thick wad of hundred dollar bills inside.

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"We were speechless for about three, four minutes, our hearts racing, but we both figured that someone had probably lost it," Ryan said.

The two didn't know what to do with the money, so both turned to their father Erik, a general manager at Brad's Chevrolet in Cottage Grove, who lived nearby them.

Erik Moi told ABC News that he was in the shower when his children stopped by.

"I heard them in the living room screaming 'Dad, we found $13,000,'" he said.

In addition to the cash, the deposit bag contained a slip indicating the total amount of the cash as well as checks made out to Reliable Credit Association, an Oregon-based consumer finance company that provides direct loans to people, either unsecured or for financing cars and household items. Reliable has an office not far from Erik Moi's house, and he happened to know the manager there.

Erik asked his kids what they wanted to do.

"They said, 'Dad, we want to turn it in,'" he said.

So, he offered to take the money to the office that afternoon.

"I said 'Kyle, you missing something?' And I handed him the bag and he just kind of turned white," he recalled.

The 26-year-old Ryan Moi said that he and his sister have gotten not only lots of praise, but also a lot of criticism.

"We've had mixed comments, you know, from people telling us that we should have kept it, that we made a mistake, telling us no one would ever have found out," he said.

Ryan Moi, who has a fiancé and 6-year-old daughter, admitted that he and Katie thought briefly about what they could do with all of the money they found.

Ryan, who is in training with a contractor and is planning to open a business resurfacing counter tops, thought about a vacation. The 21-year-old Katie, a student at Pioneer Pacific College working toward a diploma in the medical field, got her laptop stolen and thought about replacing it.

Nevertheless, those thoughts were quickly erased.

"Obviously, we couldn't keep it," Katie said. "When I had my laptop stolen, that was the worst feeling. I would not do that to someone else."

And, because the siblings found and returned the $13K, they were rewarded.

Reliable presented the siblings who found and returned $13K each with a $200 Visa gift card on Wednesday. What's more is that both received job offers, and someone who read about what they had done bought Katie Moi a new MacBook laptop to replace the one that was stolen from her.

"You know, we actually feel great," Ryan Moi said. "I mean people told us how proud they are of us and with the job offers and my sister getting a new MacBook, it's been a really great experience. We both feel great for turning the money in."

Their father is probably their biggest cheerleader, saying he was "in awe" of what they did.

"I'll be honest, my kids have had their bumps," Erik Moi said. "They've both been through rehab, so a couple [of] years ago, that money might not have made it to my hands ... so it was a very wonderful thought, or, a very wonderful thing."

ABC reported that the siblings went to rehab for alcohol addiction, although it is unclear when.

Regardless, Ryan Moi agreed with his father.

"At that time I honestly probably would have kept it and, you know, that's something that, you know, I would really like to have been said or mentioned more, because a lot of recovering addicts get ... looked down upon or judgments made," he said. "But they're -- that's kind of an example that my sister and I set, that, you know, just because you've had troubles in the past doesn't mean that you're a bad person and, you know, people can turn around."

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