Fifth-Graders Murder Plot: Why Did 2 Boys Try To Kill Their Female Classmate? [VIDEO]

By Jason Van Hoven on February 15, 2013 4:08 PM EST

A fifth-graders murder plot involving two boys planning to kill a female classmate was thwarted on Feb. 7 when a fourth-grader told a teacher that he had seen an 11-year-old boy with a knife, according to reports.

A teacher at Fort Colville Elementary School in eastern Washington discovered shortly before 8 a.m. on Feb. 7 a 3¼-inch knife, a .45-caliber Remington 1911 semiautomatic handgun and an ammunition clip inside the backpack of a 10-year-old male student. The student admitted to plotting to use the gun to ward off anyone trying to stop his 11-year-old friend from killing a girl with a knife.

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School authorities said that the fifth-graders murder plot was to lure the girl outside the school and kill her "because she was really annoying." The 11-year-old boy said that he had been friends with the girl for several months but hated her afterwards because she had recently become rude and would pick on him. The younger boy was in a short dating relationship with the girl and always made fun of him and his friends.

The boys also confessed to plots to harm another six students at the school. Plus, as CNN notes, when authorities were transporting the arrested boys to the Stevens County Courthouse, the juvenile probation department staff told a detective that they overheard the 11-year old boy telling the 10-year-old boy the following.

"If I find out who told them about our weapons, I'm going to kill them. I don't care. When I get out of jail, I'm going to come back and kill them."

"To me, 10- and 11-year-olds do bad things," said Stevens County prosecuting attorney Timothy Rasmussen. "They throw rocks through windows. They shoot BB guns at people's cars. They hit people with sticks, they set a cat on fire. Those are things that children do. But this was a plot to kill."

Rasmussen said he would argue that the 10-year-old and 11-year-old be held criminally responsible on charges of conspiracy to commit first-degree murder and witness tampering -- a charge filed after authorities said the boys promised two weeks before Feb. 7 to pay $80 to a student if he agreed to keep the murder plot a secret. 

However, Rasmussen also said that students younger than eight were considered incapable of committing criminal acts in the state of Washington. For children between the ages of 8 and 12, on the other hand, the law presumes that they are similarly incapable but calls for the court to hold a hearing to determine whether they indeed were capable. That hearing is set for Feb. 20.

"My background is a high school counselor and psychologist, and quite frankly, in 30-plus years, I never heard of anything like this at this age level," said Colville School Supt. Mike Cashion.

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