Shark Kills Film Director In New Zealand: 46-Year-Old Adam Strange Torn Apart By Great White Sharks [VIDEO]

By Staff Reporter on February 27, 2013 10:42 AM EST

Great white shark
Up to four great white sharks were reported to have mauled the body of 46-year-old swimmer Adam Strange off the coast of New Zealand. (Photo: Creative Commons)

A shark attack killed a swimmer off the coast of New Zealand on Wednesday morning.

According to local reports, approximately 200 tourists were enjoying the beach at the time of the deadly attack. An eyewitness, Pio Mosie, was one of the first to see the swimmer, 46-year-old Adam Strange, struggle with the shark. Mosie shouted at the man to make a run for the rocks.

Like Us on Facebook

Authorities were also alerted of the attack. A helicopter and lifeboat was quickly dispatched. However, the doomed Adam Strange was killed before the responders arrived.

Police fired at least 20 shots at three or four great white sharks, potentially killing one before the sharks withdrew from Strange's lifeless body.

"All of a sudden there was blood everywhere," Mosie said. "... I was shaking, scared, panicked."

"He was attacked in a circle and this poor guy ... in maybe five minutes he lost strength, so he just floated," said Christian Rasmussen, another eyewitness. "We just stood there and the whole surroundings was crimson."

Adam Strange was a film director and also a regular at the Muriwai surf club. According to surf club chairman Tim Jago, His beach outing was intended to be a training exercise for a long distance harbor swim.

Police Inspector Shawn Rutene said the incident occurred just 650 feet off shore. The vicious great white sharks were estimated to range from 12 to 14 feet long. When reporters asked whether the police had killed the shark that killed Strange, Rutene said that the shark "rolled over and disappeared."

As a precaution, helicopters will continue to patrol the waters until Thursday morning while lifeguards will continue scanning the waters for any more shark activity. Authorities have also used every single "closed" beach sign to alert the tourists.

Despite today's tragedy, New Zealand records indicate that only about 12 to 14 people have been killed by sharks since the 1830s, a remarkably low, almost insignificant figure.

New Zealand shark expert Clinton Duffy of the Department of Conservation explains that sharks often swim closer to shore in order to feed and give birth.

"Ninety-nine percent of the time they ignore people," Duffy said. "Sometimes, people get bitten."

Last year, University of Florida's International Shark Attack File reported that 80 swimmers were attacked by sharks. Of the recorded attacks, seven swimmers were killed.

Read More:

Shark Kills Surfer Off California Beach; Francisco Javiar Solorio Killed Day After Anniversary of 2010 Shark Attack

Hawaii Shark Attack: 61-Year-Old Man Lives From 10 Foot Tiger Shark Bite

Sharks Escape Into Mall: Watch Video As Glass And 33-tons Of Water Injure 15 In Shanghai Mall [VIDEO]

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Sponsored From Around the Web

    ZergNet
Follow iScience Times
us on facebook RSS
 
us on google
 
Most Popular
INSIDE iScience Times
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet  Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)