100,000 Killer Bees Attack; Watch The Victims Describe The Vicious Attack [VIDEO]

on March 7, 2013 9:46 AM EST

100,000 killer bees attack
Unlike the man pictured in this beekeeping contest, two Florida park workers were not expecting to be covered by angry bees while doing their job. (Photo: Reuters)

About 100,000 killer bees attacked a pair of park employees at Picnic Island park in Port Tampa, Fla. David Zeledon and Rodney Pugh were doing routine maintenance and trash clean-up when they found an old truck tire. Immediately after overturning it 100,000 killer bees attacked the men, engulfing them in a furious swarm. Unbeknownst to the men, the bees had built a large colony inside the tire.

Like Us on Facebook

"It was like a thousand little knives poking me in my body; my ears were just throbbing with pain," Pugh told ABC Action News. "It was like bees all in the cab. So I'm trying to swat, and they say never to swat bees."

The 100,000 killer bees attacked the men as they fled the scene. Killer bees are known to pursue targets for up to a quarter of a mile. Both men received over 100 stings from the attack but, fortunately, neither man had an allergy to bees or the attack would've proved fatal.

"It's the worst feeling, because you just had so many and they wouldn't stop," Pugh said.

Killer bees were first discovered in the wild in the U.S. in 1990, although the species was in the country as early as the 1950s. However, it wasn't until they escaped a controlled setting and began to breed in the southern U.S. that they became a serious threat. By 1993, naturally occurring swarms were recovered in Arizona and New Mexico, and the following year California confirmed arrival of this invasive species.

By 2009, over 100 counties in Texas, 13 counties in New Mexico, every county in Arizona, 14 counties in California, three counties in Nevada, two counties in Utah, 28 counties in Oklahoma, three counties in Louisiana, one county in Arkansas and 16 counties in Florida were infested with killer bees.

[CLICK HERE FOR A MAP OF KILLER BEE LOCATIONS BY COUNTY]

"The problem that we're having is the wild bees," Jonathan Simkins of Insect I.Q., the company called out to exterminate the hive, told ABC. "This pile of rubbish wasn't moved for three years. So this colony's been breeding and sending out colonies."

Simkins said there are likely several more colonies like the 100,000 killer bees that attacked the workers. ABC local news talked to the men about the attack. Here's the interview:

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Sponsored From Around the Web

    ZergNet
Follow iScience Times
us on facebook RSS
 
us on google
 
Most Popular
INSIDE iScience Times
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet  Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)