Thousands Of Dead Pigs Found In Shanghai River, Chinese Officials Detect Virus

By Staff Reporter on March 11, 2013 7:06 AM EDT

Chinese officials have detected traces of a pig virus in the water samples collected from Shanghai's Huangpu River, after more than 1,000 pigs were found dead in the river.

Authorities fished out the bodies of dead pigs from Friday night through Sunday from the Huangpu River. Earlier, it was reported that more than 1,200 pigs were retrieved from the river. But the Shanghai government announced on its official Weibo microblog Monday that the number had risen to 2,813.

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Laboratory tests of the water samples taken from the Songjiang section of the Huangpu River revealed that the water has traces of Porcine circovirus - a pig virus that does not infect humans, reports Bloomberg.

Further tests carried out on the samples showed negative results for diseases like foot-and-mouth, swine fever, hog cholera and blue-ear, according to Shanghai's agriculture department.

It is not yet clear as to where the dead pigs came from and how they were dumped in the river. Chinese officials are probing the issue. According to reports from local media, most of the pigs came from Shanghai's neighboring Jiangsu and Zhejiang provinces.

"We will continue to trace the source, investigate the cause, co-operate with neighboring areas and take measures to stop the dumping of pigs into rivers," the Shanghai Municipal Agricultural Commission said in a statement posted on its website Monday.

The city's water supply bureau has said that the quality of water has not been affected. So far, there are no reports of animal epidemic outbreaks in the city, reports Business Standard.

The Huangpu is the largest river in the city of Shanghai. The river supplies water to a population of 23 million residents in the city.

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