Alien Life Discovered In Meteorite? Algae Fossils Found In Sri Lanka [VIDEO]

By Staff Reporter on March 12, 2013 11:39 AM EDT

fossil in meteorite
Fossil diatom discovered in Sri Lankan meteorite sample. (Photo: YouTube / The Cosmos News)

Convincing evidence of alien life has been found inside a meteorite that struck Sri Lanka in December. According to a study conducted by researcher Jamie Wallis and his colleagues of Cardiff's School of Mathematics, the alien algae-like structures found in the meteorite fragments prove the existence of life beyond planet Earth.

Witnesses discovered a bright yellow fireball light up the skies over Polonnaruwa, Sri Lanka, on Dec. 29. Disintegrating as it approached the Earth's atmosphere, some say the meteorite turned green as it broke apart, raining down fragments into the villages and paddy fields below.

Like Us on Facebook

Local authorities managed to locate and collect nearly 630 samples of meteorite fragments for the Medical Research Institute of the Sri Lankan Ministry of Health. The samples were finally passed over to the researchers at Cardiff University for thorough investigation.

After thorough study and analysis, an international team of scientists made a breakthrough discovery from images captured by an electron microscope: fossilized organisms, thick-walled, carbon-rich microfossils about 100 micrometers across, were fused in the rock matrix.

Researchers were careful to measure the chemical make-up of the samples. Low levels of nitrogen rule out any possibility of terrestrial contamination.

Another image revealed a well-preserved flagella organism 100 micrometers long and just 2 micrometers in diameter. Scientists determined the unique structure was designed to survive a low-gravity, low-pressure environment and rapid freeze-drying. These conditions only exist in outer space.

The team of scientists produced a paper describing the findings in detail. The main idea presented on the paper was "panspermia," the hypothesis that life exists throughout the Universe and is spread by meteoroids, asteroids, and planetoids.

In the paper, researchers claimed to have found "clear and convincing evidence that these obviously ancient remains of extinct marine algae found embedded in the Polonnaruwa meteorite are indigenous to the stones and not the result of post-arrival microbial contaminants."

"The presence of fossilized biological structures provides compelling evidence in support of the theory of cometary panspermia first proposed over thirty years ago."

Causing an even stronger ripple across the scientific community, Chandra Wickramasinghe of the Buckingham Centre for Astrobiology, who first reported evidence of alien life in the meteorite in January, raised a theory that even pathogens like the SARS virus originated deep within outer space.

"We are all aliens -- we share a cosmic ancestry," said Wickramasinghe in the study's original publication.

"Each time a new planetary system forms a few surviving microbes find their way into comets.

"These then multiply and seed other planets.

"These latest finds are just more evidence to point to the overwhelming fact that life on Earth began on other worlds."

Despite the remarkable report, many scientists remain skeptical of the study's validity.

"So, they find some rocks, they claim [without enough evidence] that they're meteorites, and they claim [without evidence] they're from a recent meteorite fall," questioned Phil Plait, author of Slate's Bad Astronomy blog. "They find diatoms, and they claim [without controlling for contamination] that not only these diatoms came from space, but that meteorites like this seeded Earth with life.

"Which is more likely: that, or that they found a rock from Earth that already had diatoms in it?"

While it's exciting to suggest that extraterrestrial life crashed into planet Earth, more evidence proving that the rock is indeed a meteorite will be necessary before the scientific community can accept the findings.

Stay tuned as we continue to learn more in the months ahead.

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Sponsored From Around the Web

    ZergNet
Follow iScience Times
us on facebook RSS
 
us on google
 
Most Popular
INSIDE iScience Times
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet  Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)