Higgs Boson Found: Big Bang Theory And Mysteries Of The Universe To Be Revealed [VIDEO]

By Danny Choy on March 14, 2013 1:33 PM EDT

ATLAS detector CERN
ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. (Photo: Creative Commons: Image Editor)

After nearly 50 years of research, the elusive Higgs boson, the key subatomic particle necessary to understanding the Big Bang that formed our universe, is finally discovered by the scientists at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at Geneva, Switzerland.

The origin of the Big Bang theory was proposed more than a hundred years ago when scientist Vesto Slipher measured the first Doppler shift of a "spiral nebula" in 1912. Slipher realized that almost all such nebulae were receding away from Earth. Scientists calculated that the universe as we know it was created 13.77 billion years ago when a "Big Bang" caused an extremely hot and dense universe to suddenly expand very rapidly. As the universe expanded, matter in the universe including protons, neutrons, and electrons formed to give the universe its size and shape.

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In 1964, scientists suggested a theory that claimed objects gained their size and shape when particles interact in an energy field with a key particle. Physicist Peter Higgs proposed that the subatomic particle will even unlock the secrets that explain the creation of our universe. The subatomic particle was subsequently named the Higgs boson, named after the physicist. Because the discovery of the particle also implicates the discovery of the secrets to the universe, the Higgs boson is popularly known as the "God particle."

Last July, the scientists first announced the discovery of Higgs-like particles but refrained from disclosing any conclusive statement. On Thursday, physicists completed the review of an entire data set to confirm their discovery. Physicists determined whether or not the particle was a Higgs boson by examining its quantum properties and observing its behavior with other particles.

"The preliminary results with the full 2012 data set are magnificent and to me it is clear that we are dealing with a Higgs boson, though we still have a long way to go to know what kind of Higgs boson it is," said Joe Incandela, a physicist who leads one of the two main teams at CERN.

CERN finally completed the construction of its Large Hardon Collider in 2008, a $10 billion atom smasher devoted to discovering the God particle. The Large Hadron Collider is located beneath the Swiss-French border.

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