Mountain Lion Eats Pet Dog: How To Prevent A Cougar Attack

By Staff Reporter on March 21, 2013 10:34 AM EDT

mountain lion
A mountain lion in Colorado snatched and ate a pet Dachshund last week. It was the third reported mountain lion attack in the past two months. (Photo: Creative Commons)

A hungry mountain lion pounced on a small Dachshund that was walking with its Colorado owner last week. The mountain lion took off with the Dachshund and ate it.

The incident occurred within a gated community in Colorado Springs. Causing fear and a sense of insecurity among residents, the last mountain lion attack was the third reported incident in the past two months.

"We know there are mountain lions in the area, there have been other attacks several years ago," told a Colorado Springs resident.

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"'Our backyard neighbor -- a mountain lion climbed a tree and jumped onto her deck and took her dog."

According to the devastated dog owner, the wild mountain lion leaped from some shrubbery and grabbed the dog so hard that it pulled the leash from the owner. It was a split second event. The mountain lion ran off as quickly as it appeared.

"'The mountain lion came out from some bushes that are in close proximity to the street that he was walking on, grabbed the Dachshund, and tucked and pulled hard enough to yank the leash out of his hand," said Colorado Parks and Wildlife spokesperson Michael Seraphin.

The mountain lion would later eat the poor Dachshund.

Park authorities responded to the incident and interpreted the mountain lion's bold approach to the person and the domestic animal as a clear threat to public safety. Trackers managed to corner and euthanize the mountain lion within hours after the attack.

According to KOAA-TV, the mountain lion was sent to Fort Collins for a necropsy. As suspected, the remnants of the Dachshund were found in the cougar's stomach.

In the event of a mountain lion encounter, Colorado Parks and Wildlife urge hikers to refrain from running. Instead, chances of survival are greater if a person can manage to throw rocks at the lion to ward it off. Experts claim that a mountain lion will not attack a prey that fights back.

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