Anthony Lewis Dies At 85: Two-Time Pulitzer Prize-Winning Reporter Remembered For Exceptional Journalism [REPORT]

By iScience Times Staff Reporter on March 25, 2013 4:38 PM EDT

anthony lewis dies
Anthony Lewis died of renal and heart failure according to a report from the New York Times, which cites his wife Margaret H. Marshall. Margaret H. Marshall is a retired chief justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. (Photo: flickr.com / alextorrenegra)

Anthony Lewis was one of the most prominent liberal intellectuals to be published in the pages of the New York Times for about 30 years. Over his storied career, Anthony Lewis won, not one, but two Pulitzer Prize awards for his exceptional political reporting. That's why political journalists around the country were heartbroken to report that Anthony Lewis died on Monday at the age of 85.

Anthony Lewis died of renal and heart failure according to a report from the New York Times, which cites his wife Margaret H. Marshall. Margaret H. Marshall is a retired chief justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court.

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Anthony Lewis was a tenacious and rather famous journalist early in his life. He won his first Pulitzer prize in 1953 at the age of 28 for a series of articles about Abraham Chasanow that were published in the Washington Daily News. For those that are unfamiliar with the story, Chasanow was a Navy clerk for 23 years, but was unexpectedly suspended from his job after allegations of having Communist ties surfaced. Anthony Lewis reported on the unfair nature of Chasanow's firing, and the story generated so much attention that Chasanow was eventually reinstated by the Navy.

"Abraham Chasanow died the other day, and attention should be paid. He was not a famous person; he disliked the limelight. But when he was victimized at a time of fear and injustice in this country, he fought back. He made a difference," wrote Anthony Lewis in an opinion piece for the New York Times following the death of Abraham Chasanow in 1989.

"Abe Chasanow was a victim of the Federal loyalty-security program that terrorized Government employees in the 1950's. He was a ludicrously unlikely victim: a middle-class man, uninterested in politics, without a radical bone in his body. That was what made his case, and his stubborn heroism, so significant," he added.

It took Anthony Lewis exactly ten years to write his next groundbreaking story that helped earn him a second Pulitzer Prize. Anthony Lewis was praised for his coverage of the Supreme Court, especially his coverage of Baker v. Carr, a landmark redistricting case. Anthony Lewis's coverage of Baker v. Carr was so influential that one of his reports is actually cited in the decision. 

For a list of must-read Anthony Lewis stories, check out this article from The Daily Beast.

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