Komodo Dragon Attack: How An 83-Year-Old Indonesian Woman Was In A 'Fight For Survival'

By iScienceTimes Staff on April 11, 2013 9:51 AM EDT

Komodo dragon
Recent research has found that the jaws of Komodo dragons have highly complex poison glands that can cause paralysis, spasms and shock through hemorrhaging. (Photo: Creative Commons)

An 83-year-old Indonesian woman said she was in a "fight for survival" during a Komodo dragon attack on Tuesday that caused her to receive a massive amount of stitches on one of arms, according to reports.

The AFP reported that Haisah, who like many Indonesians goes by one name, was just sitting on the ground outside her house on the island of Rinca, famous for Komodo dragons and frequently visited by tourists, making a broom from a coconut tree, when an approximately two-meter dragon pounced and sunk its teeth into her.

Like Us on Facebook

"All of a sudden, a Komodo bit my right hand," she said from her bed at the hospital in the nearby town of Labuan Bajo where she has been receiving treatment since the Komodo dragon attack. "I have no idea which direction it came from. A knife fell from my right hand as the Komodo sunk its teeth into my wrist. There was nobody else around and I knew that I faced a fight for survival."

Luckily, the 83-year-old fended off the Komodo dragon attack in her "fight for survival," although there are conflicting reports on how it happened. So too are there conflicting reports on the aftermath.

"I kicked the Komodo on one its front legs with all my strength." Haisah told the AFP. "It was only one kick but it made the Komodo let go of my hand, then I screamed for help."

The Daily Telegraph reported, though, on Tuesday that Haisah hit the giant lizard's nose several times with a broom until it let go of her left hand. Then, her neighbors heard her scream and drove the animal away.

While the AFP reported that Haisah's wrist was seriously wounded during the Komodo dragon attack and needed 35 stitches, the Telegraph reported it took 20 stitches.

"I'm doing fine now," the AFP reported. "I hope my hand will return to normal so that I can make brooms again," adding that limited movement had returned to her hand after it was initially paralyzed.

The Komodo dragon attack on Haisah isn't the first in her island and most likely won't be the last.

In February, there was a Komodo dragon attack that resulted in a tour guide getting his leg bitten after he passed the dragon's lair while trekking on Rinca. Also in February, a dragon attacked two employees of the Komodo National Park, inflicting serious injuries which required intense hospital treatment.

Komodo dragons are native to several Indonesian islands, where their habitat is protected, and are considered a vulnerable species, with only a few thousand left in the world. They are the world's largest living species of lizards, able to grow up to three meters in length and weigh up to 70 kilograms (154 pounds).

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Sponsored From Around the Web

    ZergNet
Follow iScience Times
us on facebook RSS
 
us on google
 
Most Popular
INSIDE iScience Times
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet  Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)