Paul Kevin Curtis: Was Mississippi Elvis Impersonator Responsible For Sending Obama Ricin Letter? [PHOTOS & VIDEO]

By Staff Reporter on April 18, 2013 12:16 PM EDT

Paul Kevin Curtis
Elvis impersonator Paul Kevin Curtis was arrested on Wednesday, accused with with sending letters with the poison Ricin to President Obama, a U.S. Senator and a Mississippi official. (Photo: Facebook/Paul Kevin Curtis)

The FBI arrested a man on Wednesday that they believe is responsible for sending letters to President Barack Obama and two other government officials that contained the poison ricin.

Paul Kevin Curtis, believed to have sent three letters containing highly-toxic ricin to a Washington mail testing facility, was arrested at his home in Corinth, Mississippi. The three letters were addressed to the White House, the office of U.S. Senator Roger Wicker (R-MS) and a Mississippi justice official.

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The letters to both Obama and Wicker had the message in both.

"To see a wrong and not expose it, is to become a silent partner to its continuance. I am KC and I approve this message."

Washington was sent into a panic when reports of suspicious letters and packages surfaced on Wednesday, just two days after the Boston Marathon bombing. The FBI stated that the two events were not connected but parts of the Senate buildings on Capitol Hill were evacuated after the discovery of the letters.

White House press secretary Jay Carney said that mail sent to the White House is screened at a remote site to protect recipients and the public.

Ricin is a lethal poison found in castor beans, but turning it into a biological weapon takes work. It can cause death within 36 to 72 hours even with limited exposure of the chemical. There is no antidote for ricin at this time but testing is continuing in the United Kingdom and the scientists at the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory in Wiltshire believes that a antidote could be "available for use in a couple of years." A vaccine is also being created by the U.S. military.

Curtis is an Elvis impersonator who was fired from his job at a medical center in Mississippi in March 2000. He sued the hospital after accusing them of discrimination, but later alleged that he had discovered criminal activity in the hospital. According to the Clarion Ledger, Curtis posted on his Facebook that he saw a "refrigerator full of dismembered body parts and organs wrapped in plastic in the morgue." A conspiracy theorist, Curtis believed that the body parts were part of a mafia-related human body parts trafficking ring.

Curtis also posted paranoid comments about Senator Wicker on his Facebook. Curtis claims to have bumped into the Senator numerous times in Mississippi and claimed that "he (Wicker) seemed very nervous speaking to me and would make a fast exit to the door" whenever he was around.

In the majority of his Facebook posts, Curtis would end all of his comments with, "I'm Kevin Curtis and I approve this message," which is similar to the tag line that ended the suspicious letters that were sent to Washington, D.C.

At a congressional hearing, Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe told members of Congress that there have been ricin alerts since 2001, when letters containing virulent anthrax spores were sent to two U.S. Senators and news outlets in New York and Washington after 9/11.

"Over the course of years, we've had some situations where there have been ricin scares," Donahue told the hearing. "Until this date, there's never been any actually proved that have gone through the system."

Here is Curtis at work as a Elvis impersonator:

To read more about the deadly toxic Ricin, check out:

Ricin Found In Letter For Obama, Senator Roger Wicker: Top 5 Facts To Know About Deadly Toxin

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