Cinnamon Warning: Dejah Reed Warns Of Dangers After Suffering From Collapsed Lung And Pneumonia

By Staff Reporter on April 22, 2013 1:58 PM EDT

Cinnamon
The "cinnamon challenge" according to a new report has possible long-term effects which includes suffering a collapsed lung. (Photo: Creative Commons)

Youtube has 50,000 videos of people attempting the "cinnamon challenge," in which participants are challenged to rapidly consume raw cinnamon. The governor of Illinois Pat Quinn has even tried the feat, which is a decade old, but a new study shows that the challenge is not as harmless as it people may think.

The "cinnamon challenge" involves someone attempting to swallow a tablespoon of cinnamon in 60 seconds without water. However, according to a new report released Monday, cinnamon could be caustic to a person's airways, which could result in choking, throat irritation, breathing trouble and even a collapsed lung.

Like Us on Facebook

Dr. Steven E. Lipshultz, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Miami Miller School Medicine, released a report about the dangers of people taking the "cinnamon challenge" as well as the health risks that comes from it.

"People are being poisoned because of this," said Dr. Lipshultz.

The report discovered that in 2011, the American Association of Poison Control Centers received 51 calls that were related to the challenge. In the first six months of 2012, the calls rose to 178. Among the 178, 30 of them were serious enough to require medical attention. In a few cases, ventilator support was needed for teens who suffered collapsed lungs from the challenge.

The most serious case was of 16-year-old Dejah Reed, 16, from Ypsilanti, Michigan. Reed took the challenge four times including last February when she did it with a friend who didn't want to do it alone.

"I was laughing very hard and I coughed it out and I inhaled it into my lungs," Reed said. "I couldn't breathe."

Reed's father Fred came home to find his daughter a "pale bluish color" and he took her to the hospital. Dejah was hospitalized for four days with a collapsed lung and now needs an inhaler whenever she gets short of breath. She did not suffer from asthma and had no prior breathing problems before her last attempt at the "cinnamon challenge."

In addition to the instant effects of the challenge, Dr. Lipshultz says that the dried, ground spice can cause long term effects which range from scarring and inflammation of the airway to serious lung damage. For teens and young adults with pre-existing conditions such as asthma, attempting the stunt could cause even more health issues.

"It could really put them in a bad way," says Dr. Lipshultz.

While the "cinnamon challenge" is not as huge as it was even eight months ago, when 64 Australians took the challenge in rapid succession, the report claims that videos of people attempting the challenge have not completely disappeared, and other dangerous stunts have emerged to take its place. The report also mentions other dares that are now being attempted such as the "condom challenge," where participants snort a condom up their nose and pull it out of their mouth."

Here is an example of the "Cinnamon Challenge"

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Sponsored From Around the Web

    ZergNet
Follow iScience Times
us on facebook RSS
 
us on google
 
Most Popular
INSIDE iScience Times
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet  Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)