Tiny 'Alien' Skeleton Discovered In Chile: DNA Analysis Reveal Shocking Identity Of Skeleton; Is It Human? [PHOTOS] [VIDEO]

By Staff Reporter on April 24, 2013 1:22 PM EDT

Scientists at Stanford University have spent ten years studying a bizarre 6-inch alien specimen that was first discovered by Oscar Munoz in Chile's Atacama Desert on Oct. 19, 2003. The discovery of a tiny, bizarre skeleton with stereotypical alien features caused a stir, as it suggested humankind might finally have found evidence of visiting extraterrestrials. However, Stanford University researchers have finally revealed that the strange "Atacama Humanoid" skeleton belongs to a human being.

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According to reports from a local Chilean newspaper, Oscar Munoz was looking for objects of historical value at La Noria, a ghost town within the Atacama Desert. While digging near an abandoned church, Munoz discovered the body wrapped in a white cloth.

Following the discovery, the weird 6-inch alien skeleton was handed to Stanford, where scientists documented the research of the specimen in a film called "Sirius." The small skeleton possessed many of the hallmark shapes that society has interpreted to look alien, including a large sharp-chinned egg-like head over a small body.

Despite the remarkable appearance, scientists confirmed that the 6-inch alien skeleton isn't an alien at all -- scientists have determined that the specimen is what remains of a living human being. Scientists did not believe they were looking at a human at first. Unlike humans, the skeleton featured nine ribs, a bulging head and a scaly body of dark color.

Physician Dr. Steven Greer, founder of the Disclosure Project and the Center for the Study of Extraterrestrial Intelligence, shared the findings resulting from the skeleton known as the Atacama Humanoid:

"After six months of research by leading scientists at Stanford University, the Atacama Humanoid remains a profound mystery...We traveled to Barcelona Spain in late September 2012 to obtain detailed X Rays, CAT scans and take genetic samples for testing at Stanford University...We obtained excellent DNA material by surgically dissecting the distal ends of two right anterior ribs on the humanoid...These clearly contained bone marrow material, as was seen on the dissecting microscope that was brought in for the procedure."

The bone marrow was essential to extracting a DNA sample for in depth analysis.

Director Garry Nolan of stem cell biology at Stanford University's School of Medicine in California revealed results from the DNA sample:

"The DNA tells the story and we have the computational techniques that allows us to determine, in very short order, whether, in fact, this is human," explained Nolan in the film. "Sirius...I can say with absolute certainty that it is not a monkey."

Neither an alien nor a monkey, the Atacama Humanoid's miniature size prompted many observers to assume the skeleton belonged to an aborted fetus. However, according to the Houston Chronicle, Nolan determined the 6-inch skeleton belonged to a male human that has survived post-birth for six to eight years based on indications from bone density and epiphyseal plate studies.

"It is human... Obviously, it was breathing, it was eating, it was metabolizing...It calls into question how big the thing might have been when it was born."

See more images of the 6-inch skeleton below. What's more, check out the trailer for the "Sirius" movie on extraterrestrials and conspiracy theories.

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