Empire State Building Fall: How Did Nathaniel Fimone Survive Observation Deck Plunge?

By Staff Reporter on April 26, 2013 1:45 PM EDT

Empire State Building
Nathaniel Fimone jumps from the 86th floor observation deck and survives after landing on a catwalk below. (Photo: Creative Commons)

A man visiting the Empire State Building falls from the 86th floor Observation Deck. According to shocked tourists that witnessed the Wednesday midnight incident, the man climbed over the security fence and clearly intended to end his life by jumping from the iconic New York skyscraper. Thankfully, the suicide attempt was foiled.

According to reports from Fox News, 33-year-old jumper Nathaniel Fimone suffered from emotional distress. Committed to jumping from a platform more than 80 stories above the ground, Fimone's free fall ended abruptly when he landed on a catwalk between the 86th and 85th floors.

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Despite the life-saving interruption, witnesses reported that Fimone swung his legs over the side once again to resume the free fall.

"He was in his own world, like he was lost," said Argentinian tourist, Luis Ariel Jofre. "He was calm looking down, like it was nothing, but it was 80 stories high."

NYPD and FDNY responded to the suicide attempt and transported Nathaniel Fimone to Bellevue Hospital as an emotionally disturbed person. Authorities claim Fimone suffered a broken ankle and minor cuts to his hands.

Speaking with ABC News, New York Police Department Detective Mark Nell says Nathaniel Fimone faces charges for reckless endangerment, criminal trespass and disorderly conduct.

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