Gray Hair Cure? Pseudocatalase Cream Reverses Graying; When Will It Be Available?

By iScienceTimes Staff on May 6, 2013 5:19 PM EDT

Haircut
A cure for gray hair may have been discovered by European researchers, in the form of a cream which reverses graying. (Photo: Reuters)

A cure for gray hair has long been the dream of everyone from pharmaceutical companies to those fretting over lost youth. Finally a gray hair cure may have been discovered by a group of European researchers, reports Medical Daily.

In a new report published in the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, researchers say that graying hair, which occurs as a result of hydrogen peroxide accumulating in hair follicles, can be reversed with a topical cream. The cream used by the researchers is a topical, sunlight-activated compound called "pseudocatalase." Catalase, an enzyme in humans which breaks down gray-making hydrogen peroxide, weakens with age, leading to gray hair.

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"For generations, numerous remedies have been concocted to hide gray hair," said Dr. Gerald Weissmann, editor-in-chief of The FASEB journal, "but now, for the first time, an actual treatment that gets to the root of the problem has been developed."

In the study, researchers examined over 2,400 people afflicted with vitiligo, a condition in which certain areas of the skin lose their pigmentation. By using the sunlight-activated pseudo-catalase cream, researchers were able to restore skin and eyelash pigment to vitiligo patients.

Now the bad news: researchers didn't say when such a cream would be available in stores. More testing and various government approvals could take a number of years.

Until the cream is available in stores, those with graying hair can draw some comfort from another study: in 2012, researchers found that significant gray hair in wild boars was an indicator of good health. So if you're a silver fox or a wild boar that should come as welcome news.

But wait, there's more aging/hair news!

Scientists in Europe -- a continent apparently way more into hair research than North America is -- have been able to regrow hair on bald patches by injecting a volunteers' own blood into their heads. This so-called "vampire" treatment works by injecting platelet-rich plasma into the hairless area, stimulating the cells and causing hair to regrow. So to reiterate, if you're not squeamish about your own blood being drawn and then re-injected into your head, you're probably smiling as you read this.

Rejoice, graying, balding, non-squeamish men everywhere; rejoice, for your time has come.

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