New Zealand Sea Monster: Beach Animal Carcass Identified! [VIDEO]

on May 7, 2013 6:03 PM EDT

Sea Monster
An alleged "sea monster" which washed up on a New Zealand shore has been identified as an orca. (Photo: YouTube: Elizabeth Ann)

A horrifying bloated sea monster that washed up on a New Zealand beach last month has been identified by a marine biologist.

The creature was mangled and water-logged, half-buried in the sand, with no eyes yet sharp, preserved teeth. It measured about 30 feet long. After a YouTube user uploaded a video of the creature, the speculation began to pour in.

Like Us on Facebook

"This strange marine creature washed up dead on Pukehina Beach in the Bay of Plenty last week after some violent storms," YouTube user Elizabeth Ann wrote alongside her original video on April 28. "Can anyone identify what it is? It is has a huge head and teeth with rudimentary flippers. It seems about 9M in length but the lower part of the body is probably mainly entrails from an attack."

Commenters on YouTube and beyond chimed in to offer their theories. It was a giant eel. The Loch Ness Monster's spawn. A prehistoric sea monster.

But according to marine mammal expert Anton van Helden, who was sent photos of the creature by Auckland University, the sea monster that washed up on the shore of New Zealand's Bay of Plenty was decidedly less exciting.

It was just a simple orca, or killer whale. Van Helden was able to identify the "sea monster" by its distinctive orca flipper.

As Discovery points out, bloated marine carcasses like the New Zealand orca have washed up on shores for centuries. These "blobsters" (or simply "blobs") are usually in such a state of decay that they're difficult to identify, and their weird, gelatinous shapes lead many to lead to wild conclusions about them. They're sea monsters! Or dinosaurs!

But then they just turn out to be killer whales, which are still scary, but certainly not as scary as a prehistoric sea monster.

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

Join the Conversation

Sponsored From Around the Web

    ZergNet
Follow iScience Times
us on facebook RSS
 
us on google
 
Most Popular
INSIDE iScience Times
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
Do Dolphins Get High? BBC Cameras Catch Dolphins Chewing On Pufferfish Toxins
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
How Many Ways Can You Tie A Tie?
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
Ribbon Of Charged Particles At Solar System's Edge Acts Like A Wind Sock For Interstellar Magnetism
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet  Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
How to Turn Your Tap Water Faucet Into a Coffee Spout [VIDEO]
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
Coolest Science Photos Of 2013: From Blobfish To Two-Headed Shark, Comet ISON To Mars Selfie
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)
This Is A Scientifically-Proven Rock-Paper-Scissors Winning Strategy (But If Your Opponent Uses It Too, It's A Draw)