Fake Nuns Cocaine: 5 Other Bold Disguises In Drug Smuggling History

By Philip Ross on May 8, 2013 5:18 PM EDT

fake nuns cocaine
Authorities arrested three women, dressed to look like nuns, in Colombia over the weekned. The women had six kilos, or 13 pounds, of cocaine hidden under their habits. (Photo: YouTube/Video Screenshot)

Fake nuns with cocaine were arrested in a Colombian airport over the weekend with 6 kilos of cocaine, the equivalent of 60 thousand doses of the narcotic, buried under their clothing.

International Business Times reports that the women, ages 20, 32 and 37, tried to make their way through Gustavo Rojas Pinilla International Airport in San Andres, a Colombian island located in the Caribbean, on Sunday after arriving from Bogota. Dressed to look like nuns, the women had 2 kilos each of cocaine under their habits, the distinctive black-and-white garments worn by members of the Catholic religious order.

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Colombia remains one of the top suppliers of cocaine in the international illicit drug market. The three fake nuns with cocaine face charges of trafficking, manufacturing and bearing narcotics, CNN reports.

A video of the women being detained at the airport clearly shows the fake nuns crying during interrogations.

While the three women dressed as fake nuns might be the most irreverent disguise in drug smuggling history, here are five other notable masquerades used to transport illegal substances.

Manolo Blahnik Shoes

In 2011, drug smugglers from (you guessed it) Colombia, smuggled cocaine into Europe by hiding the drug in fake shoes made to look like high-end shoe brand Manolo Blahnik. The Telegraph reports that the shoes, which were given to airline passengers to bring into Spain, were molded from 4 kilograms-worth of cocaine paste and had a street value of 50,000 euros, or $66,000, a pair -- which makes the shoes' retail price of a few thousand dollars look like kids' stuff.

What's most crazy is that the drug gang had gotten away with their plan for two whole years before authorities foiled their operation.

Narcotic Submarines

First spotted in 1993, "narco-subs" can carry as much as 180 tons of cocaine. Made from fiberglass, the submarines can travel just below the surface of the water.

TIME reports that "narco-subs" are one of the most successful methods for smuggling drugs because the ships can keep a low profile and are hard to track with radar; the ships' only visible elements are a small portal, air and exhaust pipes that stick out above the water's surface. The subs are also quite high-tech, with onboard GPS, electronic charts and two kinds of radios.

Car Seat

Okay, so in this case the contraband wasn't actually drugs but a human trafficking scenario; it warrants mentioning because the guy was disguised as a car seat!

Huffington Post reports that two Moroccan citizens, ages 21 and 23, tried to smuggle a 20-year-old Guinean man across the Moroccan border into Spain by disguising him as a leather car seat. They reportedly hollowed out the foam car seat and loaded the man into the empty shell. One of the smugglers even sat on top of the fake car seat.

Birds In Trousers

Bringing wildlife into Australia, which has strict quarantine laws in order to protect public health, is very illegal, but penal repercussions didn't stop one man from trying to smuggle two pigeons into the country back in 2009.

According to the Telegraph, the two birds were wrapped in padded envelopes and stuffed inside the man's trousers. When officers searched his bags, they also found a vitamin container with two bird eggs in it. It's unclear why the man, who was coming from Dubai, insisted on trying to get his birds into Australia.

Leg Cast

In 2009, a Chilean man arrived at the airport in Barcelona, Spain, with what looked like a cast on his leg. Only thing was, the cast was made entirely out of cocaine. The cast weighed about 1 kilogram, or 2.2 pounds.

Metro reports that the drug smuggler even intentionally broke his own leg in order to make the plan that much more convincing.

Read more from iScience Times:

333 Heroin Packets In Bra: How New Jersey Police Stuffed Kim Decker's Drug Heist

Drug Bust 100 Arrested: Connecticut Heroin, Cocaine Ring Stopped After 15-Month Investigation

Priest Drug Charge: 'Monsignor Meth' Kevin Wallin Pleads Guilty To Selling Crystal Meth

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