Dead For 40 Minutes: How Did Australian Doctors Bring Colin Fiedler Back To Life? [VIDEO]

By iScienceTimes Staff on May 14, 2013 10:52 AM EDT

CPR
Colin Fiedler, an Australian man who was clinically dead for 40 minutes, was brought back from the dead by Australian doctors at The Alfred hospital in Melbourne. (Photo: Creative Commons)

An Australian man who was clinically dead for 40 minutes has been brought back from the dead using a new method of resuscitation.

When Colin Fiedler, 39, suffered a heart attack last June, paramedics asked Fiedler which hospital he'd like to go to.

"For some reason, I said The Alfred, which is pretty lucky, because they are the only one that has it," Fielder said, referring to the new resuscitation technique which is only performed in The Alfred Hospital in Melbourne, Australia.

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The resuscitation method is performed using a combination of a mechanical CPR machine, which performs continuous chest compressions, along with a heart-lung machine, which keeps blood and oxygen flowing to the heart and brain. Doctors at The Alfred have brought three patients who were dead for 40 to 60 minutes back to life, including Fiedler. None of the patients experienced disabilities after being revived by The Alfred's method.

Fiedler says he's making some changes in his life since being brought back from the dead. He's stopped smoking, and no longer worries about the little things.

"I'm so grateful, more than I could ever say," said Fiedler.

In April, a British man who was dead even longer than Fiedler made headlines. David Binks, 28, of Houghton-le-Spring, England, was dead for a shocking 70 minutes before he came back to life. Unlike Fiedler, Binks was saved with traditional CPR. Ambulance paramedics and then the hospital used CPR resuscitation and shocked him 16 times before his heartbeat returned. Doctors were amazed when he didn't suffer any brain damage as a result after his heart had stopped for 70 minutes.

"I don't think any of us expected to be told that three days later David would be out of his hospital bed. Shocked is an understatement. It's results like this that make our jobs so rewarding," said Vicky Adamson, one of the paramedics that saved Binks.

The resuscitation technique that saved Fiedler is currently only available at The Alfred, but senior intensive care physician Professor Stephen Bernard said he hopes to expand the system across the city.

© 2012 iScience Times All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.

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