Texas Tornadoes: At Least 6 Dead, Hundreds Injured; How Intense Was The Storm? [VIDEO]

By iScienceTimes Staff on May 16, 2013 11:14 AM EDT

Granbury Tornado
Multiple tornadoes tore through the Granbury area of North Texas on Wednesday night. The Texas tornadoes have killed at least six and injured over 100 people. (Photo: YouTube: tsubasachan77711)

Multiple tornadoes tore through North Texas on Wednesday night, killing at least six and injuring more than 100.

The storm, which was made up of at least 10 tornadoes where winds reached 80 mph, dropped hail the size of grapefruits in some parts. One Weather Channel meteorologist, Jonathan Erdman, speculated that one of the Rancho Brazos tornadoes may have even reached an EF-4 on the Fujita Scale of Tornado Intensity. EF-4 is the second highest level, with winds of 166 to 200 mph.

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The storm struck in the Granbury area, about 40 miles southwest of Fort Worth. Most of the 120 houses in the neighborhood were destroyed, a number of them mobile homes. The areas of Ranchos Brazos Estates and DeCordova Ranch suffered the worst.

"There were probably 75 homes in [the Rancho Brazos] subdivision that are totally destroyed,'' said Hood County Sheriff Roger Deeds at a press conference. "We haven't had a bad one like this for a while. Most of the neighborhood is heavily damaged to destroyed. Very little is untouched."

"It was horrible," said one witness. "The house started shaking. We were in a closet. You could hear it -- it sounded like a train going off. It was scary."

While that witness' house was unscathed, "everyone else's was horrible," he said.

One Rancho Brazos resident, Arlena Sherman, stood outside her house before the storm hit, with no idea how bad the approaching storm would be.

"I was standing there watching the clouds roll in," said Alrena Sherman. "I didn't have a clue."

After the storm hit, around 8:00 P.M., Sherman stepped outside of her house again to find the area around her destroyed.

"Oh my God, it was horrible," she said, adding that her house weathered the storm. "I think the trees protected [my house] but as we walked away, places were just gone."

After the storm had come and gone, Sherman and another woman, Allacia Jenny, stood in a shopping center trying to locate their friends.

"We haven't found them," Jenny said. "We don't know where they are. We've called hospitals. We've called friends. We just can't find them."

37 people were taken to a nearby hospital, according to Deeds, and another 15 people were taken to Fort Worth hospitals. Fourteen people are still missing, leading authorities to fear that the number of deaths may still rise.

The names of the victims have not been released yet, but officials say that none of them were children.

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