Plane Crashes Into Hangar: What Caused Jet To Crash Into Hangar Office? [VIDEO & REPORT]

By Staff Reporter on June 14, 2013 8:26 PM EDT

Plane
A plane crashes into a hangar, coming to a stop merely 10 yards from employees inside. (Photo: YouTube / AFP)

A plane crashed into a hangar in southern California's Chino Airport. A frightening incident, four employees were inside the hangar conducting an engine test when the rubber chalks holding the plane failed, causing the passenger jet to lurch forward and crash through the hangar on Thursday night.

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According to reports, a 600-foot Bombardier Challenger jet smashed through the hangar before it finally came to a stop merely ten yards from the terrified workers inside. Thankfully, no workers inside the hangar were hurt.

Witness Stephen Rand was sitting at a desk in the hangar when the crash occurred.

"I heard a loud bang and the whole building shook," Rand said in an interview with KTLA. "It sounded like an earthquake, bomb going off."

"I walked out and looked down the hallway and just saw a huge fuselage sticking through the middle of the hallway and knew immediately what happened," Rand continued. "There was three others and we all just started running out of the building."

The Bombardier Challenger aircraft had its engines running at full speed to conduct a stress test to its components. The rubber chalks used to hold the plane steady somehow failed, causing the unleashed plane to crash into the hangar building.

Three mechanics were inside the plane when the incident occurred. One of the mechanics suffered a knee injury. All three workers refused medical attention.

"The plane was chalked on the ramp area while undergoing an engine run-up test," FAA spokesperson Ian Gregor reported. "At some point, the plane jumped the chalks and ran into the hangar."

First responders rushed to the plane that crashed into the hangar. Fire crews hosed down the wreckage immediately.

The hangar served as a partial office space. At least four people were inside the hangar at the time of the crash.

Witness Stephen Rand expressed his thoughts when he heard the alarming impact from his desk.

"I was thinking, you know 'Is the plane going to blow up...Is there anything that's going to cause it to blow? Should I get far away from it?'" Rand said. "But I also knew that there were other people in the plane, so I was conflicted you know whether or not to try to get them out or get far away or what to do...it was kind of hectic."

Retired commercial airlines captain of 32 years, Robin Dill also witnessed the plane crashing into the hangar. According to Dill, the mechanics should have acted immediately to put the plane to idle.

"I can say -- and I think most pilots would agree -- that if the airplane was operating at idle engine speed, the aircraft would have stopped and wouldn't have continued like it did," Dill said.

Ultimately, investigators of the National Transportation Safety Board will inspect the wreckage Friday morning to understand the events that happened.

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