Kitten Car Engine: Love The Cat Survives 1,000-Mile Trip Trapped In Honda Fit

By iScienceTimes Staff on June 18, 2013 10:41 AM EDT

kitten engine
A kitten in the engine of a Honda Fit for a 2-day, 1,000-mile trip survived and is being nursed back to health. The rescuer named the kitten Love, after Chuck Love, a tow truck driver who helped save the kitten. (Photo: ABC News screenshot)

A 3-week-old kitten stuck in a car engine miraculously survived a 1,000-mile trip from Oregon to Santa Barbara, Calif. The kitten spent two days in the car engine of the Honda Fit.

Last week, the driver of the Honda Fit heard meowing coming from the car. The driver called Julia Di Sieno, the founder of Animal Rescue Team, but after the driver inspected the vehicle and failed to locate the kitten in the car engine, began the journey from Oregon to California.

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The next day, the driver called Di Sieno again, saying she thought a kitten was still stuck in the car somewhere. Di Sieno told the driver to call Santa Barbara police. The police called animal control, who couldn't find the kitten either. 

Later that afternoon, that driver called Di Sieno once more.

"I had to go do something," Di Sieno said.

She drove to the location of the Honda Fit, but was herself unable to find the cat. Di Sieno decided to call in a tow truck for help.

"They needed to get underneath the car to find it," Chuck Love of Love's Towing told ABC News. "We lifted up the car, and she still couldn't find it."

With Love's help, Di Sieno finally saw the kitten in the car's engine. Di Sieno sedated the kitten, and she and Love were finally able to free it.

"It took a half an hour, at least, to get it out, and after getting it out it was so cute and so small," said Love. "Lucky it was small, because then [otherwise] we wouldn't have been able to get it out. Of course, if it wasn't that small it would've never been able to get in there."

Di Sieno took the kitten home and began caring for the dehydrated kitten. Other than an infected eye, the kitten was in good condition, considering the circumstances, and will make a full recovery. 

Di Sieno has named the kitten Love, after the owner of the tow truck who helped save the kitten in the engine.

Kittens sometimes take shelter in the hoods of cars, because of their warmth. In Palo Alto, Calif., one police officer said that his department fields multiple calls about kittens in car engines every year, about half of which end up dying. If a driver can't get the cat out by honking or banging on the hood, the police officer said, the driver should call animal services. 

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