Brothers Save Sister From Bear In Wyoming: How Did Little Mariah Kelly, Baden Kelly and Logan Kelly Survive Everyone's Biggest Camping Nightmare? [VIDEO]

By Philip Ross on June 20, 2013 11:27 AM EDT

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Brothers save the sister from a bear attack, and are being heralded as heroes. From left: Baden Kelly, 11; Mariah Kelly, 7; Logan Kelly, 15. (Photo: YouTube/Screenshot)
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A black bear walks across a meadow near Rainy Lake near Tower Fall in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. Black bears are commonly sighted near the tree line. (Photo: Reuters)

Brothers saved their sister from a bear attack at a Wyoming campground after the bear unexpectedly tore through the family's campsite. The brothers, 11-year-old Baden Kelly and his 15-year-old brother Logan, bravely rescued their 7-year-old younger sister from the bear, and are being hailed as heroes.

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NBC-2 reports that the Kelly family was on a Father's Day camping trip in New Fork, a wilderness area on the very southern tip of Yellowstone National Park, when a black bear attracted to the scent of bacon grease charged the family's campsite.

At the time, the two parents were away at the campground's main lodge. When the bear charged the family's campsite, Baden Kelly started yelling and waving to scare the bear off. His younger sister, Mariah Kelley, was frozen in place. Baden grabbed his little sister as the bear got within 5 feet of them. That's when Logan scared the bear, allowing Baden and Mariah to escape to safety.

"I'm proud of my boys for saving my little girl," Brandon Kelly, the father, told Newsoxy.

"The moment I saw ... Moriah being brought up by the staff, it was just such a relief, and she jumped into my arms and said, 'Baden and Logan saved my life,' " the mother, Kamila Kelly, told KSL.

The bear was later determined to be about 1 to 2 years old and weighed around 75 pounds.

According to National Geographic, black bears are the most common bear in North America. They live in the forests of Canada and the northwest U.S., and are skilled tree climbers. They can also be found in swamps and mountains. They live in dens, in caves, burrows or brush piles, and can even find shelter in tree holes high above the forest ground.

Black bears live to be about 20 in the wild and reach 5 to 6 feet in length and 200 to 600 pounds. National Geographic notes that black bears are "very opportunistic eaters," and will easily develop a taste for human garbage and food, especially around campsites, cabins and rural homes. Bears that become accustomed to humans can also be dangerous.

KSL reports that even if a bear gets a hold of human food just once, it is likely to be far more aggressive in getting its claws on a home cooked meal the next time around.

There are an estimated 340,000 to 465,000 black bears in the U.S.. While estimates of the number of black bears in Wyoming is unknown, the black bear population of Yellowstone National Park is about 500 to 650 individual bears.

Outside magazine reported that between 1986 and 2010, there were no fatal bear attacks in Wyoming's Yellowstone National Park. Then, over the two subsequent summers, there were four deadly bear attacks within the park; two of the victims were partially eaten.

Still, bear attacks in North America are incredibly uncommon. According to Statistic Brain, there were just two deaths from black bear attacks in 2011, one in 2010, and two in 2009. Grizzlybay.org notes that you are 10 times more likely to die from a dog attack than a bear attack -- and even 45 times more likely compared to a black bear attack.

"For each person killed by a black bear attack there are 13 people killed by snakes, 17 by spiders, 45 by dogs, 120 by bees, 150 by tornadoes, 374 by lightning, and 60,000 by humans," grizzlybay.org reports.

Read more from iScience Times:

Bear Mauls Man: Drunk Alaskan Man Survives Attack After Provoking Bear With Barbecue Meat, [REPORT]

Bear Mauling in Montana; Company Fined $9,000: How Common Are Bear Attacks?

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